Collection

The Horse Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

This collection celebrates all things equine on New Zealand screens. Since the early days of the colony, horses have been everything from nation builders (Cobb & Co) to national heroes (Phar Lap, Charisma) to companions (Black Beauty) to heartland icons. Whether work horse, war horse, wild horse, or show pony, horses have become a key part of this (Kiwi) way of life.

The Kids From O.W.L. - Series Two, Episode One

Television, 1984 (Full Length Episode)

Armed with laser beam-firing crutches and computerised wheelchairs, 'The Kids' are a crime-fighting duo of physically-disabled teenagers working for O.W.L. (Organisation for World Liberty) to defeat the evil S.L.I.M.E. (Southern Latitude's International Movement for Evil!). Directed by Kim Gabara, this opener for the second series of the fondly-remembered show sees the kids foil a kidnap, enlist a new member, and steal a dangerous weapon: the 'Stickling Solidifier'. Neon alert: aficionados will note the early use of graphics from Apple 2 and Apple 3 computers.  

Frosty Man and the BMX Kid

Short Film, 2010 (Full Length)

In this short James Rolleston (Boy) stars as a Kiwi lad who banters with an elderly bearded fulla (Bruce Allpress) who claims to be God; the 'BMX Kid' challenges him to a Lake Wakatipu bomb competition to prove it. Kiwi stuntman/director Tim McLachlan's film was a finalist in Your Big Break, a filmmaking contest run by Tourism New Zealand which attracted over 1000 scripts from around the globe. Five finalists were given the chance to turn their scripts into a short film. The brief was to "capture the spirit of 100% Pure New Zealand — the youngest country on earth". 

Series

The Kids From O.W.L.

Television, 1984

The titular kids are a crime-fighting duo of physically-disabled teenagers working for O.W.L. (Organisation for World Liberty) in the battle against the evils of S.L.I.M.E. (Southern Latitude's International Movement for Evil!). With laser beam-firing crutches and computerised wheelchairs at their disposal they inevitably outwit the bumbling crooks. Made in Christchurch, the fondly-remembered kids' show was created by Kim Gabara and screened for two series. Neon alert: Apple aficionados will note the early use of graphics from Apple 2 and Apple 3 computers.  

Kids and Other People

Short Film, 1982 (Full Length)

This 1982 film, made for the New Zealand Council for Recreation and Sport, is an impressionistic exploration of play. Child narrators talk about what play means to them, while the images capture young people engaged in recreation. The focus is on informal play: kids and teenagers at playgrounds, hunting for frogs, reading, skylarking in the snow, doing cartwheels on the beach, fixing motorbikes, skipping, stargazing and playing Space Attack. Seagulls inspire dreams of flight for a young girl, and a fancy dress ball for adults shows the enduring spirit of play. 

Circus Kids

Bike, Music Video, 1997

'Circus Kids' was the lead single from Bike’s sole long-play record Take In The Sun, and is a prime example of the layered, classically-inspired arrangements and pop songcraft that frontman Andrew Brough had touched on in his previous band Straitjacket Fits. In this elegantly gothic promo, an innocent young boy goes a-wandering and discovers the seedy underbelly of circus life - all rendered in lush black-and-white by director Jonathan King, and veteran cinematographer Neil Cervin. 

Artist

The Video Kid

The Video Kid was one of many outlets for the musical talents of Bret McKenzie, who has done time in pop-reggae outfit The Black Seeds, the Wellington International Ukulele Orchestra and, as half of slightly successful folk-parody duo Flight of the Conchords. The Video Kid released his Prototype, his only album to date, in 2004. Described as folk-electronica-meets-synth-over-satire, it received a nomination at that year's b.Net Awards for Best Downbeat Release.  

Artist

Kids Of 88

School friends Sam McCarthy and Jordan Arts formed electropop duo Kids of 88 in 2008 after initially playing in their own bands (McCarthy was in pop-punk act Goodnight Nurse). They described their sound as "an alleyway gangbang between Grandmaster Flash and The Knack". Their debut single 'Our House' was a theme song for TV Channel C4 and entered the charts at number four. The follow-up 'Just A Little Bit' won best single and video at the 2010 NZ Music Awards. In 2011, celebrity blogger Perez Hilton declared them "breakout act" at the American SxSW festival.

Interview

Michele A’Court: From kids TV to primetime comedy...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Michèle A’Court's comedy skills have been seen on everything from Pulp Comedy to 7 Days, but she began her screen career as a presenter on kids show What Now?. The multi award-winning comedian and columnist has also been a reporter on youth news show The Video Dispatch and has acted and written for Shortland Street.

Interview

Steven Zanoski: From our favourite kids show to our favourite soap...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Shortland Street producer Steven Zanoski’s first job in television was as a writer/reporter on kids programme What Now? He went on to become a storyliner for Shortland Street and eventually the programme’s producer. During his time as a writer on the show, he also penned the screenplay for one-off TV drama House of Sticks. Zanoski has also had a hand in the development of Outrageous Fortune and executive produced Mataku and Mercy Peak.