New Zealand Mirror No. 12

Short Film, 1951 (Full Length)

This episode of 'magazine-film' series New Zealand Mirror educates its British audience about trampers, trout and trolling for big-game fish in Aotearoa. The first clip sees members of the Tararua Tramping Club hiking through mud, snow and water in the Tararua Ranges, laden with building supplies to construct a new hut. Heading up the island, the second clip captures Rotorua trout hatchery workers taking eggs from trout, and later releasing the tiny fish into waterways. The Bay of Islands stars in the final story, where a Yale University team studies big-game fish.

No Opportunity Wasted - Tough Guy (Episode)

Television, 2006 (Full Length Episode)

In this reality show Phil Keoghan (The Amazing Race), ambushes contestants and bids them to overcome a challenge with limited time (three days) and resources. This episode ditches the self-help aspect and ups the machismo by having a freezing worker, southern shepherd, champion rower, trans-Atlantic race winner, Kiwi league legend, and ex-Mr New Zealand compete in old school elimination challenges for NZ's 'toughest man' title. Future Olympic champ Eric Murray is the young buck wrestling for the hardman mantle with wily Mark 'Horse' Bourneville.

From Indonesia to India

Short Film, 1962 (Full Length)

The Colombo Plan was a Commonwealth “federation of neighbours” which aimed to counter communism in Asia by providing development aid in the area's poorer countries. This National Film Unit short, directed by future NFU manager David H Fowler, ranges across Asia as it surveys New Zealand’s contributions to the postwar plan: funding hospitals, agriculture and education in Indonesia, Malaya, Sarawak, North Borneo, Pakistan and India. The film also visits Colombo students in their home countries, passing on skills that they learned while studying at NZ universities.

Tank Busters

Television, 1970 (Full Length)

The Italian Job meets cheap jugs and a student union gig in this early heist tale from Geoff Murphy (Goodbye Pork Pie). The plot follows some university students — short on exam fees and beer money — and their scheme to crack a campus safe. Murphy enlisted $4000 and a bevy of mates (including Bruno Lawrence in one of his earliest screen roles), and made it over nine months of weekends. It sold to local television (as well as the ABC in Australia). Its deliberately low key, naturalistic acting stood in stark contrast to the stage-influenced television dramas of the time.

Marae DIY - Rongomaraeroa-o-nga-hau e wha Marae (Series 11, Episode Three)

Television, 2015 (Full Length Episode)

This episode from the 11th season of the award-winning show sees presenters Te Ori Paki and Ria Hall and company makeover a unique marae: Rongomaraeroa-o-nga-hau e wha. The marae in Waiouru serves members of the NZ Army — aka Ngāti Tūmatauenga — and the local community. Capturing the role of taha Māori in the Defence Force, the makeover enlists 140 new Army recruits, locals, whānau, hapu, ex-military personnel from all over New Zealand, and Victoria Cross recipient Willie Apiata. This season saw Marae DIY shift from Māori Television to TV3.

Weekly Review No. 310 - Mail Run

Short Film, 1947 (Full Length)

This post-war Weekly Review boards a RNZAF Dakota flying “the longest air route in the world”: a weekly 17,000 mile ‘hop’ taking mail to Jayforce, the Kiwi occupation force in Japan. Auckland to Iwakuni via Norfolk Island, Australia (including a pub pit-stop in the outback), Indonesia, the slums of Singapore, Saigon, Hong Kong; then Okinawa, Manilla and home. Director Cecil Holmes’ pithy comments on postcolonial friction and rich and poor avoided censorship, but won a warning not to rock the boat. The next year he was controversially sacked from the National Film Unit.

Kaleidoscope - Auckland High-rises

Television, 1986 (Full Length)

By the mid 1980s Auckland had shifted from city of sails, to city of cranes. In the lead-up to the 1987 sharemarket crash, it was in the grip of "an unprecedented building boom". This 1986 Kaleidoscope report looks at the demolition and development from an architectural angle, as malls and mirror glass transform the city. Interviewees include developer Seph Glew of the (ill-fated) Chase Corporation, and his architects. Architecture critic Mark Wigley rates the BNZ Tower an "insult", but says Auckland's "crude" new buildings have at least provoked debate about what the city needs. 

Toehold on a Harbour

Short Film, 1966 (Full Length)

This vibrant NFU travelogue takes the pulse of NZ's capital after 125 years of Pākehā settlement and finds a "colourful, casual" city that has had to impose itself on the landscape to endure. Highlights include the 90 sec opening flyover, some off-the-wall music choices in the score and vox pops that are well shy of 'coolest little capital' chutzpah. The wind puts on a requisite show but so do the city's 32 miles of beaches, with a Riviera-esque Oriental Bay beaming on a good day. The mower on a rope trick looks dodgy to a more health and safety conscious age.

Moynihan - You Can't Win 'Em All (Episode Two)

Television, 1976 (Full Length Episode)

Ian Mune is Leo Moynihan, secretary of the carpenters’ union, who — with orange mini and leather jacket — has to navigate the shark-infested waters of 70s industrial relations. In this episode, earthquake regulations, a shifty minister and stand-over tactics from worksite agitators, count amongst Moynihan’s workplace problems. At home he has to introduce lecturer girlfriend Sarah to his young son. The NZ-Australia co-production (with ABC) was the first drama series made by TV One’s drama department. It won Feltex awards for best drama and Mune’s performance.

Christchurch 1974

Short Film, 1970 (Full Length)

This National Film Unit film visits Christchurch roughly four years before the main event, to promote the city’s readiness to host the Commonwealth Games. A comical potted history of New Zealand precedes a montage of young women cycling around Canterbury environs and a split screen catalogue of NZ tourist attractions, before getting into a survey of the venues. As the opening demonstrates, “there’s always a traditional welcome awaiting our friends!” In 1973 the NFU completed a second film called Christchurch 74, before covering the games themselves in the feature-length Games 74