Interview

Dave Smith - Funny As Interview

In 1969 Dave Smith acted in New Zealand's first televised comedy sketch show, In View of the Circumstances.

Series

McPhail and Gadsby

Television, 1980–1987, 1999

After turning "Jeez Wayne" into a national catchphrase with the sketch show A Week of It, comedy duo David McPhail and Jon Gadsby (plus third writer AK Grant) followed with McPhail & Gadsby, which aired on TVNZ for seven seasons — plus a reprise in 1998 and  1999. After a sometimes controversial debut season in which each episode was devoted to a specific theme (religion, sex etc), the show settled into a steady diet of political satire, spoofs and impersonations of public figures — including McPhail's famous caricature of PM Robert 'Piggy' Muldoon.

Interview

Jon Bridges & Paul Yates - Funny As Interview

Jon Bridges and Paul Yates met at university in Palmerston North, before performing with comedy group Facial DBX (see this Funny As interview).

Interview

Tom Scott - Funny As Interview

After training to be a vet, cartoonist and writer Tom Scott ended up spending more time with creatures of the animated kind.

Interview

Annie Whittle - Funny As Interview

Annie Whittle had already made her mark as a singer, before she played all the female roles on the first season of comedy hit A Week of It.

Interview

Tim Batt - Funny As Interview

After starting in radio, comedian Tim Batt found his place with podcasts, including The Worst Idea of All Time — New Zealand’s most globally successful podcast. He discusses podcasts in this Funny As interview, and also talks about: Watching a “painfully shy” Guy Williams perform his first stand-up show His first radio job, learning from legendary DJ Kevin Black The challenges of being a political comedian in a small democracy Comedians moving into the commentary space, and whether that's good for society Working with comedian Guy Montgomery on The Worst Idea of All Time How 7 Days made it respectable to be a comedian in New Zealand Being "livid" when youth channel TVNZ U was cancelled — after “honing some of the best comedians in our part of the world”

Interview

Thomas Sainsbury - Funny As Interview

Thomas Sainsbury is an accomplished playwright, actor and director, who found national fame in 2017 with his Snapchat impressions of MP Paula Bennett.

Interview

Sharon Murdoch - Funny As Interview

Hailing from the deep south, political cartoonist Sharon Murdoch started out as a designer and came to cartooning later in life.

Interview

Jessica Hansell - Funny As Interview

Jessica Hansell (aka Coco Solid) is a creative chameleon — she's an artist, musician, writer, director and actor. The creator of animated series Aroha Bridge talks about a variety of topics in this Funny As interview, including: Realising the power of comedy to tell important stories — and be a "political weapon" How writing and acting in Māori news satire Brown Eye in 2015 "made people realise I wasn't messing around" How her Aroha Bridge characters are a "Frankenstein of Māori and multicultural archetypes I see every day" The "massive effect" Billy T James had on her, and how his Captain Cook sketches "taught you about the truths of colonisation" Rating the acting of childhood friend Madeleine Sami as the "standard that I hold other performers to"

Interview

Helene Wong - Funny As Interview

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story author Helene Wong grew up in 1950s Aotearoa, and has worked in the arts as a performer, writer, and film critic. She discusses her varied career in this Funny As interview, including: Growing up with radio comedy, being the class clown at school, and realising that you could make people laugh with voices and accents The university capping review being a revelation and a liberation — presenting an opportunity to deal with issues and being more than just "prancing about on the stage" How the introduction of television meant being able to see politicians — "their physicality, their flaws and their body language" – providing wonderful source material for satirists Working with Roger Hall, John Clarke, Dave Smith and Catherine Downes on university revue One in Five, and mimicking three-screen promotional film This is New Zealand to open the show Working for Prime Minister Robert Muldoon in the 70s as a social policy advisor – despite spending “the previous few years having a lot of fun satirising him”– and feeling that he had a "kind of dark force field around him" Reaching a turning point in comedy about Asians in New Zealand; Asians have started to "take back the power" and "as opposed to encouraging audiences to laugh at us, we’re now getting them to laugh with us"