Blowin' Dirt

Goodshirt, Music Video, 2001

Goodshirt's attention-grabbing promos were typified by high concepts rendered with low-budget No 8 wire smarts — often with game participation from the band members. This mind-bending creation by director (and ex-Supergroover) Joe Lonie is no exception: a Mazda 929 (or an Austin 1300, if you watch the video's other version) is re-deconstructed, before leaving in a cloud of smoke, loaded with frog men. Lead singer Rodney Fisher gives the standout performance. He had to sing every lyric backwards to achieve the desired time-warping end result. 

Loading Docs 2014 - Homing

Web, 2014 (Full Length)

“How could I capture a New Zealand home in three minutes? Could I make a film without relying on standard documentary conventions of interview, cutaways and narration?” Inspired by the idea of making a more reflective, meditative piece for viewers watching on computers or phones, filmmaker Andrew Scott uses a single shot to move through a Kiwi summer home. There’s no one home but the minutiae of sound — from cicadas to the Mr Whippy tune — evoke the life of the place. Homing was made as part of Loading Docs, a series of short films designed for viewing online. 

Sophie

Goodshirt, Music Video, 2002

How long does it take to remove all the furniture and fittings from an apartment? If you’ve got band Goodshirt on the case, apparently three minutes and 45 seconds. One of a series of Goodshirt music videos directed by Joe Lonie, all of them filmed in one continuous take, this clip highlights the dangers of having the volume up too loud. As a young woman listens to Goodshirt’s latest single, she is unaware she is being robbed her of everything she owns. Sophie took away three gongs at the 2003 NZ Music Awards: Best Video , Best Single and Songwriter of the Year.

40 Years

, Music Video, 2009

Shot on Wellington's South Coast, the video stars Academy Award-nominee Taika Waititi (who also directs) as a turquoise headband wearing jogger attempting an eclectic confidence course. Shot in one ducks-in-a-row long take, our hero slays knights, frees prisoners and crosses the finish line into the arms of his lover. And a horse. A splendid example of she'll-be-rightism, the clip is refreshingly lo-fi, makeshift and delightful — and undoubtedly took a lot more than four minutes and 15 seconds to make.

Permanent Wave

Short Film, 1996 (Full Length)

"A social satire about an entire Antipodean generation, comfortable with what it knows best." London, 1983. It's time for a party. A group of young New Zealanders have arrived at the other end of the world to drink, play Kiwi music, search for shelter, and talk about other New Zealanders. Scripted by playwright Fiona Bartlett, this ambitious OE story plays out in one single ten minute shot (Three takes were printed). Director Jonathan Brough later directed episodes of Outrageous Fortune, The Pretender and short film No Ordinary Sun.

Home Again

Shihad, Music Video, 1998

This Shihad classic has a classic video to match. With primary colours accentuated and the energy levels of Shihad turned up to match, the band members perform and bustle about in a film studio in one extended shot, without any edits. The time and motion tomfoolery is surely handled; someone has had the bright idea of putting developing Polaroid photos at the bottom of the frame, in order to show that the whole video is unravelling in one continuous scene. Directed by Mark Hartley, Home Again was judged Best Video at the 1998 New Zealand Music Awards.

Touchdown

The Stereo Bus, Music Video, 1999

'Touchdown' was drawn from the second (and final) Stereo Bus album Brand New (1999). The stylishly minimalist video, directed by Alex Sutherland and Michael Lonsdale, appears to be a continuous shot, circling around band members and objects in a white studio set. Biffed chairs and bottles, and singer David Yetton, get up close to the lens while guitarist Jason Fa'afoi (who was co-hosting What Now? at the time) also makes multiple appearances. The slow pan matches the tempo of the band’s textured guitar pop; the promo won Best Music Video at the 2001 NZ Music Awards.

Always on My Mind

Tiki Taane, Music Video, 2008

The fourth single from Tiki Taane’s first solo album, ‘Always on My Mind’ is an unadorned, heartfelt love song featuring Tiki accompanying himself on acoustic guitar. It became his breakthrough hit, a chart topper and the first Kiwi digital single to achieve platinum sales. The video is one continuous shot set in an imagined “Heathcote Valley Hall” (a nod to the Christchurch suburb where Tiki grew up) with Tiki unplugged, a shimmering floor and a backdrop inspired by Elvis Presley’s legendary 1968 Comeback Special. It won Best Solo Video at the 2008 Juice TV Awards. 

Sweetness

Short Film, 1992 (Full Length)

Director Rachel Davies subverts expectations in a confronting film about a young boy's relationship with an older man. In one continuous piece-to-camera shot a boy recounts his first sexual experiences at a scout camp. What is the relationship between the ambiguous identity of the subject (boy or girl? why does he have a man's voice?) and the gravity of what's being said? This intriguing confessional marked an impressive debut for Davies, who was only 21 when she made Sweetness. It received awards at the Sydney and San Francisco Film Festivals.

The Booyeouw Shamble

The Inkling, Music Video, 2005

A drummer plays in four locations and keeps playing as he moves; and, at each, a woman is at a different stage of her life. The Booyeouw Shamble was shot in Wellington by director Sam Buys and DOP David Paul in one continuous 54 minute take. Drummer P-Hill had to follow a score taped to his snare; and each hit had to be in the correct sequence for the entire 54 minutes. In editing the footage was sped up or slowed in at least 1000 places to get the drum hits in time with the music. There were no rehearsals and there was time for only one take.