Artist

Fat Freddy's Drop

Fat Freddy's Drop worked up a reputation for epic live gigs (first captured on 2001 album Live at The Matterhorn) before dropping Based On A True Story. The first local indie album to top the New Zealand charts, it was voted 2005's favourite Worldwide Album by listeners on Gilles Peterson's BBC Radio 1 show. Soul-pop tracks like 'Wandering Eye' and sales of 120,000 plus saw them anointed flagbearers of the 'Wellington Sound'. The band operates as a collective, sharing songwriting credits and royalties equally between all members. To date, the band's four studio albums have all topped the local charts.   

Fat Freddy's Drop - Based on a True Story

Television, 2006 (Full Length)

This documentary follows the "seven headed soul monster direct from the shores of Wellington" — Fat Freddys Drop — as they rumble their dub-rich sound through Europe like a Houghton Bay roller. Touring to showcase album Based on a True Story, it features rehearsals and performances, eating Italian kai moana, playing concrete ping pong in Berlin, and (in the fifth clip) a jam with Cliff Curtis. Radio 1 DJ Zane Lowe lauds the 'fullas' and Mu explains whanau to German journos. True Story sold 120,000+ copies and dominated the 2005 New Zealand Music Awards.  

Making Music - Fat Freddy's Drop

Short Film, 2005 (Full Length)

In this episode from a series made for high school music students, Dallas Tamaira and DJ Mu recall Fat Freddy's Drop's early history as a duo with just turntables and a microphone in a vibrant Wellington scene. They reveal an aversion to rehearsals, preferring to develop their music in a live setting and Mu demonstrates the component parts of their song 'Midnight Marauders' on his secret weapon — an Akai sampler capable of emulating all of the instruments in their sound. His verdict that every school should have one may not have gladdened principals' hearts.

Wandering Eye

Fat Freddy's Drop, Music Video, 2005

Set in a Grey Lynn fish'n'chip shop, this clip delivers a killer kai moana concept, when it's revealed that the greasy takeaway is merely a front for the club downstairs. Winner of Best Music Video at the 2006 Vodafone NZ Music Awards, the video features a host of cameos in addition to the members of Fat Freddy's Drop: including Danielle Cormack, Ladi6, John Campbell and Carol Hirschfeld. It was directed by Mark 'Slave' Williams, sometime MC for the band. The track was part of Fat Freddy's first studio album Based on a True Story, one of the biggest-selling in Kiwi history.

Collection

Wellington

Curated by NZ On Screen team

In 1865, Wellington became the Kiwi capital. In the more than 150 years since, cameras have caught the rise and fall of storms, buildings, and MPs, and Courtenay Place has played host to vampires and pool-playing priests. Wind through our Wellington Collection to catch the action, and check out backgrounders by musician Samuel Scott and broadcaster Roger Gascoigne. 

Boondigga

Fat Freddy's Drop, Music Video, 2009

The video was directed by Mark Williams (aka MC Slave) and the concept was born over yum cha sessions with the band. In the clip the Fat Freddy's crew are abducted by mad scientist and former child prodigy musician Boondigga (Taungaroa Emile). Taunted by FFD's soul sounds, he conducts a lab experiment to extract the music from their brains.     

Squeeze - Splore

Television, 2004 (Full Length Episode)

The Splore summer music festival has always been as much about alternative lifestyles as live music: in other words, it's a poi twirling, hippie paradise. Presenter Jane Yee teams up with Evan Short — one half of electronica act Concord Dawn — to wander around the idyllic Waharau Regional Park setting, take a wedding snap at the 'Las Vegas Wedding Chapel', and witness the air-cracking skills of The Wild Whip Man. Yee also chats to Fat Freddy's Drop and Nathan Haines, and showcases videos for 'Don't Tell Me' (Concord Dawn), 'Hope' (Fat Freddy's), and 'Doot Dude' (Haines). 

Series

Making Music - Te Waihanga Pūoro

Short Film, 2005

This series, made for use as a teaching resource in secondary schools by the NZ Music Industry Commission, was produced and directed by longtime Kiwi music champion Arthur Baysting. The full series featured 47 leading acts (including Don McGlashan, the Black Seeds, Nesian Mystik, Chris Knox and Fat Freddy's Drop) talking directly to the next generation of musicians about their music and careers. They offer intimate performances of classic songs, and heartfelt advice on subjects including songwriting, recording techniques, technology and the music industry.

Artist

MC OJ and Rhythm Slave

Irrepressible duo MC OJ (Otis Frizzell) and the Rhythm Slave (Mark Williams) emerged as teenagers in the first wave of Kiwi hip hop. In the early 1990s they released album What Can We Say? and a series of singles for Murray Cammick's Southside label. After a brief spell in quartet Joint Force, the pair turned their attentions to televison to front the hip hop influenced Mo'Show. Frizzell (son of artist Dick Frizzell) is a prominent graffiti artist and tattooist to the stars, including Robbie Williams; Williams directed the award-winning music video for 'The Catch' by Fat Freddy's Drop, and often performs with the band live.

Artist

Benny Tones

Producer/engineer Benny Tones grew up on a commune in Golden Bay at the top of the South Island — and cites the slow paced, collaborative nature of life there as a major influence on his music. Initially a DJ, he began producing his own beats in 2002. He moved to Wellington, setting up his own studio (incorporating his collection of vintage equipment) and working closely with Electric Wire Hustle. In 2010, he released his debut album Chrysalis (with contributions from Sacha Vee, Adi Dick and members of Shapeshifter, Fat Freddy’s Drop and Rhombus).