Collection

The Animation Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Animated plasticine. Talking chickens. Dancing Cossacks. Plus old favourites bro'Town, Hairy Maclary and Footrot Flats. From Len Lye to Gollum, feast on the talents of Kiwi animators. In his backgrounder to the Animation Collection, NZ On Screen's Ian Pryor provides handy pathways through the frogs, dogs and stop motion shenanigans. 

Collection

Turning Up the Volume

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Auckland Museum's Volume exhibition told the story of Kiwi pop music. It's time to turn the speakers up to 11, for NZ On Screen's biggest collection yet. Turning Up the Volume showcases NZ music and musicians. Drill down into playlists of favourite artists and topics (look for the orange labels). Plus NZOS Content Director Kathryn Quirk on NZ music on screen. 

Collection

Aotearoa Hip Hop

Curated by DJ Sir-Vere

Rip it Up editor and hip hop supremo, Philip Bell (DJ Sir-Vere) drops his Top 10 selection of Aotearoa hip hop music videos. The clips mark the evolution of an indigenous style, from the politically conscious (Dam Native, King Kapisi) to the internationalists (Scribe, Savage). It includes iconic, award-winning efforts from directors Chris Graham, Jonathan King, and more.

Making Music - Warren Maxwell

Short Film, 2005 (Full Length)

TrinityRoots' vocalist and songwriter Warren Maxwell talks about his career and songwriting in this episode from a series for secondary school music students. Maxwell explains the genesis of the Wellington roots/reggae act's classic 'Little Things' (and the making of its music video); he performs a stripped back excerpt from the song. Maxwell also recalls the problems the band encountered in recording their first album and previews a new work, 'Angel Song' (which later appeared on TrinityRoots' second album Home, Land and Sea).  

The Living Room - First Episode

Television, 2002 (Full Length Episode)

Wellington band The Black Seeds present the debut episode in this TV series profiling creative Kiwi culture. They begin by going behind the scenes on their action-packed music video Hey Son (with Bret McKenzie donning a Captain Cook meets Freddie Mercury number). There’s an early profile of Auckland graffiti/ streetwear artist Misery (complete with cycle interview, and cameo from artist Elliot 'Askew' O'Donnell), London-based Ta Moko artist Te Rangitu Netana talks about life away from home, and tattooing Robbie Williams; and there’s a piece about skateboarding mag Manual.

Collection

The Pacific Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

NZ On Screen's Pacific Collection celebrates many things — many islands, many cultures, and the many Pasifika creatives who have enriched Aotearoa, by bringing their stories to the screen. The collection is curated by Stephen Stehlin, whose involvement in flagship Pacific magazine show Tagata Pasifika goes back to its very first season. In his backgrounder, Stehlin touches on sovereignty, diversity, Polyfest and bro'Town — and the relationship between Pacific peoples and Māori in Aotearoa. 

Her Hairagami Set

The Brunettes, Music Video, 2007

This award-winning puppetry/comic book creation follows a put upon heroine enduring jibes from the cool crowd about her hairstyle. She resolves to rectify her situation using a new 'Hairagami Set'. The video was created by duo Trophy Wife (Ian and Rebecca Hart), who later revealed that the Hairzilla monster was a late addition, after US record label Sub Pop felt uncomfortable with "school shooting imagery". The clip won Best Music Video at the 2008 Vodafone NZ Music Awards. Check out the true to life puppets of band members Jonathan Bree and Heather Mansfield.

Artist

Fetus Productions

Fetus Productions' nine-year existence from their birth in 1980 was marked by forays into experimental film, multi-media art and fashion. The "audio visual performance group", whose original line-up included Jed Town, Sarah Fort and Mike Brookfield, memorably screened medical films during their gigs. In 2002, fans were treated to Fetus Reproductions at Auckland's Artspace, in which Town produced a video installation revisiting the group's early work.

Mana's Bounce

Recloose, Music Video, 2005

Winners of Best Director at the 2006 NZ Kodak Music Video Awards, Jeremy Mansford and Preston McNeil, the talented duo behind the music video production company Mo Fresh, pull out all stops to construct a delightfully innovative and cheeky clip. The video also won Best Use of Visual Effects at the Below Ground Music Vid Fest Australia.   "With 812 body parts, 55 characters and 927 photos, this was a massive mish, but made possible with a helping hand from friends and fam." Jeremy Mansford/Preston McNeill    

Better, Not

Inverse Order, Music Video, 2008

Directed by Rollo Wenlock (founder of video production tool Wipster), this dark, moody music video was shot in a studio with a lot of cooking oil, dodgy transmission and some flickering fluorescent lights. If you like watching well-oiled male torsos, you’re in luck. After gaining a new drummer, the band reinvented itself as Villainy, and went on to score NZ Music Award-winning albums Mode.Set.Clear. and Dead Sight