Collection

Best of the 60s

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Before X Factor there was New Faces, before Masterchef ... Graham Kerr, before Country Calendar there was ... er, Country Calendar. This collection picks the screen gems from the decade that gave Kiwi pop culture, "miniskirts, teenagers — and television." Peter Sinclair, Sandy Edmonds, Howard Morrison, and Ray Columbus star. Do your mod's nod and C'mon

The Best Day of My Life

Television, 2006 (Full Length)

Wedding photographs are attempts to create and preserve perfection, taken under pressure. Can the results be art as well as personal history, or are they neither? Such questions are the focus of this Artsville doco, which benefits from insights by a multi-cultural cast of wedding photographers. Geoffrey Heath questions the reality of glamour and romance in some of his own art photography, while labouring to capture beauty in his wedding work. Others recall the challenges of getting good shots amidst drunkenness, dysfunctional families, and grooms in their undies. 

Letter to Blanchy - A Dinner Down Under

Television, 1994 (Excerpts)

Letter to Blanchy was an old-fashioned backblocks comedy, which centered on the bumblings of a trio of mates living in a fictional small town: intellectual Derek (David McPhail), rough-diamond Barry (Jon Gadsby) and tradesman Ray (Peter Rowley). In this excerpt from the second episode, the lads plan a "traditional" hangi for local gentleman Len. Amongst much non-PC humour, railway irons are proposed in place of hot stones, pasta in place of pig, and a keg disrupts preparations. Hole-digging is much debated in the usual Kiwi bloke way.

Operation 8

Film, 2011 (Trailer)

On October 15 2007, citing evidence of guerilla camps involving firearms training, police raided 60 houses across NZ, many of them in Ruatoki, near Whakatāne. In production for almost as many years as the ensuing legal proceedings, this provocative documentary proposes that the so-called “anti-terrorism” raids were bungled, racist and needlessly terrifying to children. The film’s subtitle ‘Deep in the Forest’ is inspired by ex Red Squad second-in-command Ross Meurant, who argues that as police move into specialist units they grow increasingly paranoid.

Back of the Y Masterpiece Television - 4, Series One, Episode Four

Television, 2001 (Full Length Episode)

This episode of Chris Stapp and Matt Heath's bawdy, bad taste series promises "action packed action". The constables need the assistance of the Onehunga Armed Offenders Squad to deal to the threat posed by a small boy with a water pistol. Host Danny Parker interviews "retarded South Island mechanic" Spanners Watson about the increase in mechanical incompetence and hospitalisations since he joined stuntman Randy Campbell's crew. Campbell's stunt will only ever end one way. "NZ's number one porn detective" Smoodiver also debuts.

Queer Nation - Peter Ellis: A Queer Perspective

Television, 2003 (Full Length)

This is the second part of a Queer Nation special about Peter Ellis, who was accused of molesting children in a Christchurch crèche in 1992. It examines how Ellis's sexuality permeated the case and its coverage, and influenced public opinion. It also focuses on the gay community's lack of support, and proposes reasons. Interviewees include Lynley Hood, whose book A City Possessed argued the case had the hallmarks of a witch hunt, Gay NZ editor Jay Bennie, and lesbian psychologist Miriam Saphira, who helped set up the guidelines under which the children were interviewed.

The Gravy - Series Three, Episode 11

Television, 2008 (Full Length Episode)

In this installment of Sticky Pictures' award-winning art series, the show visits the idiosyncratic Matthew Squire of Levin — whose emergence as a painter in the wake of a life-changing accident is retold with poignant wit. Back in Wellington, Kerry Ann-Lee explains the influence of her Chinese heritage and hardcore-punk on her prolific run of 'zines' and collage-based work. Finally, conceptual artist Gill Gatfield prepares for an exhibition of sculptures using materials as varied as grass, electrified wire and disposable nappies.

Andrew

Fur Patrol, Music Video, 2001

The lead off track from Wellington band Fur Patrol’s debut album Pet (and follow up to their chart topping single ‘Lydia’) sees an unrepentant Julia Deans emphatically despatching someone who has wronged her for the last time. The video — shot in a club on Auckland’s Karangahape Road — sets Deans and bandmates amidst frozen bar patrons who spring to life with the first tempo change. The band responds with an (almost) accomplished dance routine in best boy band style ... nicely undermined by Deans’ rather graceless tumble out of the final pose.

University Challenge - 28 Nov 1981

Television, 1981 (Full Length Episode)

TVNZ's long running quiz show pitted four-member teams from the country’s universities against each other for egghead bragging rights. Host Peter Sinclair (C'mon, Happen Inn) poses the "starter for 10" and presides over this second semifinal from the fifth series. Sinclair is typically sharp — "Lake Taupō. A very hesitant answer to what I thought was a very easy question" — as teams from Victoria and Canterbury (eventual series winners) compete for a finals place. Subjects range from The Decalogue to Dire Straits. Calculators and encyclopedia are at stake.

He Toki Huna - New Zealand in Afghanistan

Film, 2013 (Trailer)

He Toki Huna sets out to provide an independent overview of New Zealand’s involvement in Afghanistan (the longest overseas war in which NZ has played a role). The documentary follows writer Jon Stephenson conducting eyewitness interviews in Afghanistan, and poses tough questions about the involvement of Kiwi troops in a conflict that co-director Kay Ellmers calls an “ill-defined war against an unclear” enemy. Ellmers and Annie Goldson made the Moa Award-winning film for Māori Television. An extended cut played at the 2013 NZ International Film Festival.