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Rodeo Kaupoai - Series One Finale

Television, 2006 (Full Length Episode)

In this Māori TV series about the NZ rodeo circuit, the action has come to Outram in Otago for the final meeting of the year. Competition has been close throughout the season — and the race for the title of All Round Champion Cowboy (and “The Buckle” trophy) is wide open, with at least three of the four Church brothers still in contention. Competition is fierce inside the ring, but, outside it the riders are happy to swap tips; and when the last steer has been roped and bronco ridden, there’s nothing for it but to “dress up flash and have a party”.

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Rodeo Kaupoai - Series Two Finale

Television, 2007 (Full Length Episode)

The final meeting for the 2006 season features in this episode of the Māori TV series following the NZ rodeo circuit. Riders have come to Millers Flat in Central Otago to compete in bareback riding, calf roping and tying, bronco riding, bull riding, steer wrestling and barrel racing competitions. The grand prize of the title of All Round Champion Cowboy is still up for grabs — but there are no certainties in rodeo and champions can be dumped just as heavily as novices (with the possibility of serious injury ever-present in the thrills and spills).

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Series

Rodeo Kaupoai

Television, 2006–2007

This series was made for Maori TV (Kaupoai means “cowboy”) about the summer rodeo circuit, and the cowboys (and occasional cowgirl) who battle it out with bulls, broncos and each other for the title of Cowboy of the Year. Voiced in te reo, it follows the progress of members of five families from the East Coast (the home of NZ rodeo) including four brothers from New Zealand’s rodeo royalty, the Church family (with their father a 13 time winner). The physical challenges — and toll — are plain to see; but competition, camaraderie and prize money conquer most fears.

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Hunchin' Down the Track

Television, 1980 (Full Length)

Rodeo thrills and spills — Kiwi style — are on display in this doco following two cowboys travelling the circuit in a '50s Chrysler. They compete in events in Fairlie, Rerewhakaaitu and Warkworth, and encounter American stars along the way. Broncos, calves and bulls are ridden, wrestled or roped; but pride of place goes to spectacular shots of them using rodeo skills to capture deer by helicopter. Cowboy up indeed. A parade, the 'Cowboy's Prayer' and fearless rodeo clowns also feature. Legendary commercials maker Geoff Dixon (founder of company Silverscreen) directs.

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Heartland - Omarama

Television, 1993 (Excerpts)

Heartland host Gary McCormick visits South Island town Omarama, which is "about as remote as you can get in New Zealand, as it sits in the centre of the South Island at its widest point." McCormick talks to sheep farmers battling pest rabbits and the invasive weed Heiracium Hawkweed, checks out a fishing competition, and attends the Omarama Rodeo. At the rodeo he meets the Church family of rodeo riding brothers, listens to a spot of yodelling, and takes in the children's sheep riding display.

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Champions - New Zealand Winners

Television, 2008 (Full Length)

In the summer of 2007-2008 freelance photographer Jessie Casson and her family embarked on a road trip around New Zealand in a classic caravan (which threatened to fall apart along the way), to compile a book and accompanying documentary on some of our less-celebrated champions. Among them are gumboot throwers, an A&P show baker, naked Nelson cyclists, a shepherd, a singer, a family of champion woodchoppers, a Cromwell cherry spitter, Hokitika coal shovellers and lamb shearing record holder Emily Welch, who sheared 642 lambs in nine hours.

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The Fastest Gun Down-Under

Television, 1985 (Full Length)

The stars in an Auckland harbour master’s eyes are of the cowboy variety in this documentary that goes behind the scenes of the Western Districts' Fast Draw Club. The westie club takes literal inspiration from its name, as its members — from truck drivers to accountants — meet in the basement of a dairy to recreate scenes from the American wild west. Director Greg Stitt aimed to explore, “the fantasies ordinary people need to survive”; and his partly-dramatised doco details the impressive preparation (and passion) that goes into the live shows and stunts.

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It's On (Move to This)

3 The Hard Way, Music Video, 2003

Set in cowboy bar/truckstop "The Cask Cleaver Rodeo Restaurant" and featuring a girl on a mechanical bull, this clip is classier than a Kylie Minogue lingerie commercial. Minogue's people obviously drew the line at drunken bar room brawls complete with smashing glassware and a stage cage. James Barr's clip is simple yet slick, skillfully edited and lit with a warm golden palette. Even the violent bar brawl seems somehow... mellow.

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Interview

Julian Arahanga: From acting in Once Were Warriors to directing Songs from the Inside...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Actor turned producer/director Julian Arahanga made his screen debut at age 11, starring alongside Annie Whittle in short film The Makutu on Mrs Jones. He shot to fame playing novice gang member Nig Heke in landmark movie Once Were Warriors, then went on to act in a number of films including Broken English. Since setting up his own production company Awa Films, Arahanga has directed and produced TV series Songs from the Inside and acclaimed documentary Turangaarere: The John Pohe Story.

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Geoff Dixon

Director

Geoff Dixon began making commercials in the 70s — the decade he launched legendary ad company Silverscreen Productions, whose clients included Cadbury, Toyota, Air New Zealand and Singapore Airlines. Ranging across New Zealand and beyond, his work includes iconic images of South Island back roads, Barry Crump crashing utes through the bush, and Michael Hurst singing a war cry for the Kiwi bloke.