Radio with Pictures - Dunedin 1982

Television, 1982 (Excerpts)

This 1982 Radio with Pictures report surveys the Dunedin music scene, and the bands who are starting to be grouped together under the label ‘the Dunedin Sound’. Critic Roy Colbert discusses the influence of punk pioneers The Enemy and Toy Love, and the benefits of being outside fashion. A roster of future Flying Nun notables are interviewed, including David Kilgour, Shayne Carter, and Jeff Batts (The Stones). Martin Phillipps is psychedelic, and Chris Knox dissects the new bands’ guitar-playing style (without using the word "jangly"!). And then there’s Mother Goose.

Radio with Pictures - South Island Music

Television, 1984 (Full Length Episode)

RWP reporter/director Brent Hansen (later head of MTV Europe) visits the South Island: checking venues, talking to local luminaries, catching live bands and generally taking the pulse of the local music scene. Flying Nun is on the rise (and just starting to attract international attention) although none of the label's major acts are playing near the RWP cameras. Christchurch is in flux waiting on the next big pop act to emerge, while Dunedin is a hive of activity with a new generation of Flying Nun acts starting to come through. Then there's Crystal Zoom...

Heavenly Pop Hits - The Flying Nun Story

Television, 2002 (Full Length)

This documentary tells the story of the legendary Flying Nun music label up to its 21st birthday. The label became associated with the 'Dunedin Sound': a catch-all term for a sprawl of DIY, post-punk, warped, jangly guitar-pop. The Guardian: "[it's] as if being on the other side of the world meant the music was played upside down". Features interviews with founder Roger Shepherd and many key players, the spats and the glory. The label's influence on the US indie scene is noted, and Pavement's Stephen Malkmus covers The Verlaines' 'Death and the Maiden'. 

For Good

Film, 2003 (Trailer and Excerpts)

New Zealand's so-called 'cinema of unease' is stretched in new directions in this psychological drama, inspired by real-life interviews with criminals and victim's families. Writer/director Stuart McKenzie's feature debut follows Lisa (Michelle Langstone), a young woman haunted by the rape and murder of a former teenage acquaintance. Lisa's fascination leads her to the victim's parents - and to prison, to interview the charismatic killer (Tim Balme). The result is an intelligent examination of the after effects of violent crime. Shayne Carter provides the soundtrack.

Nothing to Lose

The Adults, Music Video, 2012

This brooding collaboration with Ladi6 from Shihad frontman Jon Toogood's other project The Adults, is yet another departure from his hard rocking day job (although guitarist Shayne Carter briefly raises the temperature). Director Sam Peacocke's split screen video was shot at legendary Auckland studio The Lab (where The Adults recorded their debut album). Ladi6 anchors one side with a typically soulful performance while Toogood (uncharacteristically playing bass), Carter, drummer Gary Sullivan and engineer Nick Roughan are all serious intent beside her.

Artist

The Adults

A Kiwi supergroup, The Adults had their origins in songs written by Shihad frontman Jon Toogood that didn't suit that band. Instead, Toogood reached out to Shayne Carter (Straitjacket Fits, Dimmer) and Julia Deans (Fur Patrol) to help him record them for a solo project. The original songs were soon shelved in favour of all new collaborations and an album was recorded with a diverse pool of musicians including Anika Moa, Ladi6, Warren Maxwell (Little Bushman), Gary Sullivan (Dimmer, JPSE) and Tiki Taane (who co-produced the project with Toogood).

Done

Straitjacket Fits, Music Video, 1992

The first single from the final Straitjacket Fits album features a typically oblique Shayne Carter lyric hinting at despair and defiance  possibly touching on the departure of founding member Andrew Brough. The overcast lyrical content and lurching, hard edged guitars find their match in this black and white video from director Andrew Dominik, which shrouds the band in studio shadows. Dominik went on to direct lauded films Chopper, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, and Killing Them Softly (the latter two starring Brad Pitt).

Welcome to My World

Bike, Music Video, 1997

This video for Andrew Brough's band Bike features the group playing in a moving caravan, which is being driven by a frazzled father (Topless Women Talk about their Lives actor Ian Hughes). Says director Jonathan King: "I had a vision of Shayne Carter in mirror shades playing a policeman. He agreed on the condition he wouldn't shave his mo. Of course it just added to the moment. Ian Hughes brought his new puppy, Olive, along because he had no one to look after it, so we integrated it into the action. In fact much of the fun stuff he does was him just improvising on the day."

Artist

Bike

Andrew Brough was the McCartney to Shayne Carter's Lennon when Straitjacket Fits led the southern charge, during Flying Nun's late 80s golden age. After leaving the band, eager to develop more of his own material, Brough rolled back into the spotlight in 1995 with Bike. 'Save My Life', from their debut EP, was a songwriting finalist at the 1996 Silver Scrolls, and featured in classic Dunedin movie Scarfies. Bike were nominated as most promising new band at the 1997 NZ Music Awards. Bike's sole album Take In The Sun affirmed Brough's status as an eminent crafter of yearning, liquid guitar pop.  

Winning Arrow

Bic Runga, Music Video, 2005

Directed by Darryl Ward, this gorgeously shot video boasts a stellar cast of players and backing vocalists, including Anika Moa, Shayne Carter, Neil Finn, Anna Coddington and drummer Rik Gooch. All were contributors to Runga's third album, Birds. Ward achieves a delicate, occasionally light-hearted tone, as the Kiwi all-star band performs Runga's mellow message of finding hope amidst glumness. "Casting a line to you ..."