Dave Dobbyn's musical career is legendary, from songs 'Whaling', to 'Loyal'; from his early work in bands Th'Dudes ('Be Mine Tonight', 'Bliss') and DD Smash ('Outlook for Thursday', 'Magic') to a solo career that has encompassed eight albums — plus the soundtrack for Footrot Flats: The Dog's Tale. The iconic singer-songwriter has been pumping out hit songs since the late 1970s. En route he has received countless accolades — including an industry Lifetime Achievement Award — and ten of his songs appeared in New Zealand's Top 100 songs, as voted by music royalties organisation APRA. 

Dreams Lie Deeper

2014 - Television

In November 2010, 29 miners died in the Pike River disaster. In 2014 Wellington’s Orpheus Choir invited singer Dave Dobbyn to compose a musical tribute to the victims. Dreams Lie Deeper followed Dobbyn to Greymouth to meet with mourning families, and visit the mine. This excerpt shows the premiere of Dobbyn's song ‘This Love’ in Wellington on 10 May 2014, to a standing ovation. The film screened on TV One on the fourth anniversary of the disaster. Sunday Star Times critic Grant Smithies called it “one hell of a documentary. Raw, touching and blessedly unsentimental.” 

Th' Dudes - Right Second Time

2007 - Television

In 2006, Th’ Dudes reformed after 26 years. This documentary follows them on a national tour as members Peter Urlich, Dave Dobbyn, Ian Morris, Lez White and Bruce Hambling reflect on their former lives as late 70s pop stars. Encouraged to behave like stars, they didn’t disappoint. There are frank discussions about sex, drugs, an obscene t-shirt, on-stage nudity and other bad behaviour — but also the stories behind classic songs like ‘Bliss’, ‘Right First Time’ and ‘Be Mine Tonight’, which still captivate adoring, if aging, audiences a quarter of a century later.

Intrepid Journeys - Morocco (Dave Dobbyn)

2005 - Television

In this full-length episode of Intrepid Journeys, Dave Dobbyn arrives in the Kingdom of Morocco, and finds himself bowled over by the sites, sounds, the sense of living history, the friendly people — and the sugar-heavy local tea. Uplifted to heights both spiritual and comedic, he wanders the world's largest medieval city, in Fez; visits Hassan ll Mosque in Casablanca, one of the world's largest, and finds himself donning a British accent as he starts a camel trek in the Sahara. From Casablanca to Marrakesh, the journey offers Dobbyn a sense of delight and creative renewal. 

Dave Dobbyn - One Night in Matatā

2005 - Television

After floods swept through the Bay of Plenty town of Matatā in May 2005, musician Dave Dobbyn decided to drop by and see how the locals were doing. One Night in Matata is built around a free concert which Dobbyn and his band performed during the visit. Also included are conversations with townspeople, about the day heavy rains caused torrents of water and debris to sweep through Matatā. Dobbyn remains upbeat, praising the locals for their kindness and community spirit. Later some of the local children join him on stage for 'Slice of Heaven'. 

Homegrown Profiles: Dave Dobbyn

2005 - Television

This episode of C4's music series Homegrown Profiles looks at the 30 year career of singer/songwriter Dave Dobbyn, whose songs are mainstays of the Aotearoa soundscape. Dobbyn talks about nerve-wracking early days with th' Dudes, where the name for band DD Smash originated, and his long solo career. In a wide-ranging and thoughtful interview, Dobbyn discusses the highs and lows of a life in music, including the mayhem and causes of the 1984 Aotea Square riot, being told his best album was unreleasable, and the satisfaction of writing the Footrot Flats soundtrack.

Welcome Home

2005 - Music video

A heartwarming tribute to the spirit of togetherness, this clip by Tim Groenendaal is a celebration of Aotearoa's many colours. Fork lift drivers, bank tellers, dairy owners and Ahmed Zaoui lend weight to the central theme: "We come from everywhere. Speak Peace and Welcome Home. Dave." Taken from 2005 album Available Light, Dave Dobbyn's paean to home has become the unofficial anthem of wistful expat Kiwis everywhere.

Dave Dobbyn in Concert

1994 - Television

Dave Dobbyn in Concert is weighed strongly towards songs from Twist, the 1994 album that NZ Herald writer Graham Reid described as "breathtaking in its daring, ambition and reach". Dobbyn performs alongside a band which includes Twist producer Neil Finn. Although the offkilter soundscapes of the album are necessarily cut back on stage, Twist's strong musical bones remain clear. 'It Dawned on Me' showcases the curly-haired one in especially fine voice, while hit single 'Language' works wonders when stripped back to Dobbyn, Finn and twin acoustic guitars.

Language

1994 - Music video

This clip for Dave Dobbyn's lament about the difficulty of expressing love is a moody mix of colour, black and white, and a blue wash. Directed by Kiwi music video veteran Kerry Brown it cuts together various examples of disconnected and connected folk with a passionate performance from Dobbyn. Robyn Gallagher in her 5000 Ways blog piece on the video muses on the early 90s goatee and wonders: "[but] why dress Dave Dobbyn like a bogan dad?"

TV3 Begins - First Transmission

1989 - Television

TV3 celebrated its launch with a two-hour special featuring music, montages, and a Māori welcome. Aotearoa's first new television channel in more than two decades went to air on 26 November 1989, after years of meetings, hard graft and competing bidders. This clip of TV3's first ten minutes creates a party atmosphere of smiling happy faces. Dave Dobbyn and dancers get energetic in promotional song 'Get the Feeling', then Governor-General Sir Paul Reeves pulls the launch lever. Also featured are appearances by a wide array of Kiwis, from children to soldiers to Sam Hunt.

Loyal

1988 - Music video

This is a cleverly-choreographed one shot video for the Kiwi classic written by Dobbyn when based in Sydney. (Even if it's debatable whether the moving house/moving on imagery actually suits the lyrics of the song.) Dobbyn's jersey and his video girl's entire get-up firmly date-stamp the romance and real estate story in the 80s, but the song has outlasted the knitwear: In 2001 APRA members voted it the third-best New Zealand song of the 20th Century. Loyal was later used by Team New Zealand as its campaign song for its 2002 defence of the America’s Cup.  

Love You Like I Should

1988 - Music video

Despite the enduring success of the title track, ‘Love You Like I Should’ was the big hit from Dave Dobbyn’s first solo album Loyal. It’s an upbeat rocker complete with horns which Dobbyn has described as a “rant”. The lyrics echo the album’s themes of love and loyalty but the message of defiance to the “powers that be” seems to hark back to the messy, failed prosecution he faced after the Queen Street riot. The video captures the energy of song and performance as Dobbyn confronts the camera and backing singer Margaret Urlich models her gaucho look.

Oughta Be in Love

1986 - Music video

The Footrot Flats soundtrack marked Dave Dobbyn's first steps as a solo artist. Inspired by his love of 50s crooners, 'Oughta be in Love' accompanied Wal Footrot's wooing of Cheeky Hobson (but sung, perhaps mercifully, by Dobbyn and not Footrot's voice, John Clarke). The video shows Dobbyn hard at work as a jobbing soundtrack composer on a song that has taken on a life of its own. Winner of a Silver Scroll and Single of the Year, it has become a Dobbyn classic and perennial wedding favourite (even gracing Hayden and Loretta's nuptials in Outrageous Fortune).

Slice of Heaven

1986 - Music video

The 1986 adaptation of Murray Ball's beloved Footrot Flats comic strip was a huge hit in Aotearoa and Australia. Born from a John Barnett idea, the movie’s trailer doubled as a promo for the Dave Dobbyn-Herbs theme song: one leveraged the other. Directed by cinematographer John Toon (Rain) while the song was being recorded at Wellington's Marmalade Studios, this screened before Crocodile Dundee in Australian cinemas. The single spent four weeks atop the Aussie charts. Back home ‘Slice of Heaven’ was 1986 Song of the Year, and reached unofficial National Anthem status.