Max Quinn began dabbling in filmmaking as a teenager. Aged 17, he joined the NZBC as a trainee film cameraman. At 25 he was shooting landmark dramas like Hunter’s Gold. In 1980 Quinn moved into directing and producing. Since joining Dunedin’s Natural History Unit (now NHNZ) in 1987, his double-barreled talents have helped establish a reputation as one of the most experienced polar filmmakers on the globe.

She got a sniff of me and she came right up to me. There I was on my own on the sea ice, with this beautiful big female polar bear, stalking me no more than 10 metres away. Max Quinn on filming an anestheised polar bear, for series Ice Worlds

Screenography

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The Lost Whales

1997, Director, Producer, Camera - Television

For 150 years, southern right whales (tohora) were hunted to the brink of extinction, but the discovery of a “lost tribe” in the Southern Ocean sparked hope that their numbers are increasing. This documentary - made for Discovery Channel - follows a research expedition to learn about the pod. Breathtaking and intimate underwater footage, including a fabled white whale and new-born calf, unveils the behavior of these gentle giants. The award-winning film also captures soaring royal albatross, vomiting sea lions, and a flightless duck.

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Ngaio Marsh Theatre - Died in the Wool

1978, Camera - Television

Died in the Wool was part of a TV anthology adapting the murder mysteries of Dame Ngaio Marsh. MP Flossie Rubrick has been found dead in a wool bale, and it's up to Inspector Roderick Alleyn (UK actor George Baker — Bond, Z Cars, I, Claudius) to unravel the secrets of a South Island sheep station. The tale of a cultured Englishman amidst World War II spies, Bach and seamy colonial crimes — like Marsh's books — found a global audience: it was the first NZ TV drama to screen in the US (on PBS). Includes a Cluedo-style sitting room inquest and a wool shed reveal.

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Richard Pearse

1975, Camera - Television

Around 31st March 1903 eccentric farmer Richard Pearse climbed into a self-built monoplane and flew for about 140 metres before crashing into a Waitohi gorse bush. The amount of control he maintained and exact date (before the Wright bros?) has been oft-debated, memorably by a speculative zoom in Forgotten Silver. This TV film dramatises the life of the reclusive young inventor and his flying machine, from his youth to events leading up to take off and the flight itself. Actor Martyn Sanderson captures "Mad Dick's" obsession in a Feltex-winning performance.

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Hunter's Gold - Episode One

1976, Camera - Television

This classic kids’ adventure series follows a 13-year-old boy on a quest to find his father, missing amidst the heady 1860s Otago gold rush. Under the reins of producer John McRae, it brandished unprecedented production values, and panned the Central Otago vistas for all their worth. Its huge local popularity was matched abroad (BBC screened it primetime); it showed that NZ-made kids’ drama could be successfully exported. This first episode sees plucky Scott Hunter (Andrew Hawthorn) steal away to Tucker’s Valley, spurred on by his doubting uncle.

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Bidibidi - First Episode

1990, Producer, Director - Television

Like the eponymous native plant this children's puppet programme stuck to the socks of many kiwis of a certain vintage. Produced in Dunedin by TVNZ's Natural History Unit (now NHNZ), Bidibidi followed the adventures of a sheep on a South Island station for two series. Adapted from the children's book by Gavin Bishop, the show interspersed puppet scenes and musical numbers with actual wildlife footage. This first episode sees Bidibidi chasing a rainbow with advice from Stella the kea; includes beautifully shot images of a menagerie of native birds.

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The Mackenzie Affair - Tancred (Final Episode)

1977, Lighting Cameraman - Television

The Mackenzie Affair told the story of colonial folk hero James Mackenzie: accused of rustling 1000 sheep in the high country that would later bear his name. This fifth and final episode sees the manhunt for Mackenzie over, with ‘Jock’ facing a sentence of hard labour and provoking sympathy from equivocal sheriff Henry Tancred. Adapted from James McNeish’s book, the early co-production (with Scottish TV) imported Caledonian lead actor James Cosmo (Braveheart, Game of Thrones) and veteran UK TV director Joan Craft. It was made by Hunter’s Gold producer John McRae.

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Emperors of Antarctica

1992, Director, Camera - Television

This film tells the story of Antarctica’s emperor penguin (the real world inspiration behind Happy Feet) and how they survive vicious blizzards and -50°C. It also retraces the epic “worst journey in the world” that explorer Edward Wilson made to discover these remarkable birds. Max Quinn won a best director award at the 1994 NZ Television Awards for the Antarctic Trilogy that Emperors was part of (as was Quinn's The Longest Night). The trilogy helped establish NHNZ’s relationship with Discovery Channel, and the penguin-falling-through-ice scene (clip one) became a YouTube hit.

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Play School

1972 - 1990, Director - Television

Play School was an iconic educational programme for pre-school children, which was first produced in Auckland from 1972, then Dunedin from 1975. The format included songs, a story, craft, a calendar, a clock and a look outside Play School via the shaped windows. But the toys, Big Ted, Little Ted, Jemima, Humpty and Manu, were the real stars of the show. The title sequence ("Here's a house ...") and music were a call to action recognised by generations of Kiwis. Presenters included actors Rawiri Paratene and Theresa Healey, Russell Smith and future MP Jacqui Hay.

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What Now?

1981 - present, Director - Television

What Now? is a long-running entertainment show for primary school-aged children. Filmed before a live studio audience on weekend mornings, What Now? is a New Zealand TV institution; it was the first TV show to have live phone-ins. The series is known for its challenges that sometimes result in participants being 'gunged'. A roll-call of presenters includes Steve Parr, Danny Watson, Simon Barnett, Jason Gunn, Michelle A'Court, Tamati Coffey, Antonia Prebble, and more. 'Get out of your Lazy Bed' by Matt Bianco is the theme song memorable to generations of Kiwi kids.

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Ngaio Marsh Theatre - Vintage Murder

1978, Camera

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Bidibidi

1990 - 1991, Producer, Director - Television

Like the eponymous native plant this children's puppetry programme stuck to the socks of many kiwis of a certain vintage. Produced in Dunedin by TVNZ's Natural History Unit (now independent production company NHNZ) Bidibidi followed the adventures of a sheep on a South Island station for two series. Bidibidi was adapted from the children's book by Gavin Bishop. Each programme interspersed puppet scenes and musical numbers with the expected first-rate NHU-shot footage of birds and other animals that Bidibidi meets en route, from kea to skinks and bitterns.

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Jewels of the World

2010, Camera

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World at Your Feet

1987, Director, Producer

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Hunter's Gold

1976, Camera - Television

This classic kids’ adventure tale follows a 13-year-old boy on a quest to find his father, missing amidst the heady 1860s Otago gold rush. When it launched in September 1976 the 13-part series was the most expensive local TV drama yet made. Under the reins of producer John McRae, it brandished unprecedented production values, and panned the Central Otago vistas for all their worth. Its huge local popularity was matched abroad (BBC screened it primetime); it showed that NZ-made kids’ drama could be exported, and helped establish SPTV (later renamed TV2).

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The Longest Night

1992, Director, Camera

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Moon Jumper

1986 - 1987, Director

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Expedition Antarctica

2009, Director, Producer, Camera

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How's That

1979 - 1980, Director

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Wildtrack

1988,1988, Director, Producer - Television

Wildtrack was a highly successful nature series for children, combining a Dunedin studio set with reporting from the field. Produced by TVNZ’s Natural History Unit, it ran from 1981 through several series to the early 90s. Producer Michael Stedman sought to produce a series where “children can be excited and entertained with genuine information, while not neglecting adults”. Wildtrack won the Feltex Television Award for the best children's programme three years running (1982 - 1984).  

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Fast Forward

1989,1989, Director, Producer - Television

This Christchurch-based TVNZ science and technology show put science in primetime in the 1980s (notably on Friday nights before Coronation Street). The successor to Science Express, it sought to explain how science was changing everyday NZ life; and reporters (including Jim Hopkins, Liz Grant, Peter Llewellyn and Julie Colquhoun) attempted to engage the public without alienating the scientific community, and vice versa. Its run ended in 1989 when TVNZ decided it couldn't compete with the runaway success of Australian counterpart Beyond 2000.

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Antarctica: Planet of Ice

1993, Director

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After School

1980 - 1989, Director - Television

After School was a hosted links format that screened on weekday afternoons. Its initial host was Olly Ohlson, who was the first Māori presenter to anchor his own children's show. After School also broke ground in its use of te reo Māori on screen, as well as sign language. The show and Ohlson are remembered by a generation of New Zealanders for the catchphrase (with accompanying sign language) "Keep cool till after school". After School was later hosted by Jason Gunn and Annie Roache, and was where puppet Thingee achieved small screen fame.

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Ice Worlds

2000, Director, Producer, Camera

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A Wild Moose Chase

1998, Director, Producer, Camera

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What Lies Beneath

2007, Director, Associate Producer

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The Mackenzie Affair

1977, Camera - Television

The five-part series told the story of colonial outlaw James Mackenzie: accused of rustling 1000 sheep in the high country that would  bear his name. His escapades on the lam elevated him to folk hero status. Like producer John McRae’s prior series, Hunter’s Gold, the South Pacific Television ‘prestige’ drama was made with export in mind. Adapted from James McNeish’s book, the early co-production — with Scottish TV, where the opening episode was shot — imported Caledonian lead actor James Cosmo (Braveheart, Game of Thrones) and veteran UK TV director Joan Craft.

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Albatross Watch

1987, Director

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Awesome Pawsome 2 - The Next Generation

2010, Director, Producer

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Viewfinder

1986, Director

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Primeval New Zealand

2011, Camera

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Abalone Wars

2013, Camera, Post-Production Producer

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Ozone - Cancer of the Sky

1993, Director, Producer, Camera

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Realm of the Rhododendron

1994, Director, Producer, Camera

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Into the Teeth of the Blizzard

1999, Producer, Camera