Orlando Stewart has appeared in various mockumentary series as a reporter, talent manager, and 'marketing director', handing out pizza flyers in Pakuranga. As he says, “it’s kind of fun blurring the lines between yourself and a character”. Stewart acted in short film The Dump, which he also produced, and directed Philip Dadson documentary Sonics from Scratch, which screened at the 2015 NZ Film Festival.

...nothing Orlando Stewart does is normal. He was dementedly brilliant as the manager in the series Wayne Anderson: Singer of Songs and he has that same psycho humour. Deborah Hill Cone in The NZ Herald, on Orlando Stewart's show Rural Drift, 26 December 2010
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Philip Dadson: Sonics From Scratch

2015, Director, Producer - Film

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Tihei

2015, Producer - Web

This 2015 Loading Docs short follows Tihei Harawira as he freestyle raps at Otara Markets. Diagnosed with autism and dyslexia as a child, Harawira didn’t ‘fit’ and was the victim of bullying. But an appreciative audience at the flea markets — where he busks ad hoc rhymes set to a beat box — have enabled Tihei to find his voice. ‘Tihei’ means “the breath of life”, a name he was given by an aunty after being resuscitated at birth. Tihei was directed by Hamish Bennett and produced by Orlando Stewart, the team behind 2014 NZ Film Festival award-winner Ross & Beth.

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Ross and Beth

2014, Producer - Short Film

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The Forgotten Astronaut

2013, As: Martin Sanderson - Short Film

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Booger

2012, As: Peter - Short Film

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Deane Waretini: Now is the Hour

2012, As: Orlando Stewart

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Project Matauranga

2012, Producer, Director - Television

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The Dump

2012, Producer, As: Orlando - Short Film

Eleven-year-old Utah gets dumped with his estranged dad for the day in this 2011 short film. Dad is the sole employee at a Northland rubbish dump. Utah is embarrassed by his Dad’s job and recycled gifts, but thanks to a trash tour and reversing lessons, gets to know him better. One of the first products of the NZ Film Commission’s Fresh Shorts scheme, the film won director Hamish Bennett a NZ Writers Guild award for Best Short Film Script. The Dump was the first short from teacher Bennett and actor/producer Orlando Stewart; they followed with 2014 award-winner Ross and Beth.

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Whare Taonga - First Episode

2012, Researcher, Production Coordinator - Television

This award-winning TV series explored whare significant to a community, using the buildings themselves as a vessel for storytelling. Interviews delve into each whare’s design and build, and its cultural and historical significance. This first episode visits Whakatane to enter Ngāti Awa’s globetrotting meeting house, Mātaatua. After 130 years the building was returned home and restored, following a Treaty of Waitangi settlement. It reopened in 2011. The te reo series was made by the company behind architecture show Whare Māori. To translate, press the 'CC' logo at the bottom of the screen. 

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Whare Māori - Kainga/The Village (First Episode)

2011, Writer - Television

This first episode of the award-winning Māori Television series looks at the influence of the idea of 'the village' on Māori architecture. Architect Rau Hoskins is guide; he ranges from traditional designs, such as Rotorua's Whakarewarewa thermal village, to Rua Kenana's extraordinary circular meeting house — with its club and diamonds decor — built on an Urewera mountainside. Hoskins ends up at Wellington's 26 metre high Tapu Te Ranga Marae, made from recycled car packing cases. The episode won Best Information Programme at the 2011 Aotearoa Film and TV Awards.

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Whare Māori - The Wharenui (Episode Two)

2011, Director - Television

This episode of the Māori Television series looks at the place of the wharenui in Māori architecture. Rau Hoskins explores the origins and meaning of the structure, and looks at some iconic examples: a replica pataka being built in Hamilton Gardens; te hau ki turanga (the oldest surviving example of a wharenui) controversially taken by colonial forces, now displayed at museum Te Papa Tongarewa in Wellington; and Ngākau Māhaki at Auckland's Unitec — designed by master carver Lyonel Grant and replete with dashboard lights from 70s Holdens.

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Rural Drift

2011, Writer, Producer, As: Orlando Stewart

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Feedback

2010, As: Orlando Stewart - Television

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Tamariki Ora: A New Beginning

2010, Writer - Television

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Tamariki Ora: The Sounds of Hope

2010, Writer - Television

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Wayne Anderson - Glory Days (Series Two, Episode One)

2009, Writer, As: Orlando Stewart - Television

This first episode in the second series made about “South Auckland’s finest singer”, Wayne Anderson, sees his career at a crossroads. Poor sales have torpedoed his breakthrough concert at Sky City and his manager, Orlando, is preoccupied with his new job at a car park. Still, there’s a gig at Acacia Cove — the most glamorous venue on the rest home circuit; and Wayne is now getting styling advice from Faye (a fellow member of the Elvis Presley Fan Club). Even more exciting is the prospect of taking his music to Manukau with his own radio station.

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The Secret Life of John Rowles

2008, Additional Writer, Additional Director - Television

The meteoric career of one of NZ’s greatest entertainers is examined in this documentary. John Rowles went from a Kawerau childhood to stardom in London at 21; but, after headlining in Hawaii and Las Vegas, he saw it all slip away. Those roofing ads and near bankruptcy followed, but Rowles has retained his self belief and that voice. A stellar cast of interviewees analyse his strengths and weaknesses, including Sir Cliff Richard, Tom Jones, Neil Finn and late promoter Phil Warren. Amongst the star cameos, John’s sister Cheryl Moana explains the downside of his best-known local hit.

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Wayne Anderson - Singer of Songs (First Episode)

2006, Writer, As: Orlando Stewart - Television

This debut episode of a not completely fictional series follows Wayne Anderson, “Manurewa’s greatest singer”, and his attempts to break out of the rest home circuit and find fame and fortune. Wayne dreams of taking the evergreen music of his idols Engelbert and Elvis to the world. But even his manager’s show business links  — he works in a video store  —  aren’t bringing in the 50 dollar gig needed each week. Things may be looking up with the best perm Wayne’s ever had, plus an audition in a Karangahape Road bar. As a non-driver, he will have to get there by bus.

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Toi Māori on the Map

2006, Camera Operator - Television

In 2006 the two-year long Pasifika Styles exhibition launched at Cambridge University’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The show was ground-breaking for confronting the contentious origins of the museum's Pacific artefacts, by inviting 15 contemporary Māori and Pacific artists over to show works and "revitalise the taonga" already on display. Shown on Māori Television, this documentary follows two of the artists, George Nuku and Tracey Tawhiao, from K Road to the cloisters of Cambridge to collaborate with objects, curators, fellow artists and scholars.

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Wayne Anderson: Singer of Songs (short film)

2005, Writer, As: Orlando Stewart - Short Film