Producer Steven O'Meagher is the founder of Auckland production company Desert Road, whose work includes acclaimed TV police drama Harry and Emmy-nominated docudrama The Golden Hour. O'Meagher developed Bill O'Brien's Aramoana massacre account 22 Hours of Terror into acclaimed feature Out of the Blue. The film went on to box office success and multiple Qantas awards.

I was immediately drawn to the potential of the story as a film, because it touched on so many human emotions: despair, hope, light and darkness. Steven O’Meagher, on Out of the Blue
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Consent - The Louise Nicholas Story

2014, Producer - Television

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Harry

2013, Producer, Creator - Television

This TV3 drama series follows the travails of a cop (Oscar Kightley) as he pursues justice on the mean streets of Auckland. Solo parent to a teenage daughter (following his wife’s suicide), Detective Sergeant Harry Anglesea is thrown into a murder investigation and an underworld of P and gang violence. Harry, not a stickler for the rules, marked a rare dramatic turn for Oscar Kightley. Sam Neill plays his policing buddy. NZ Herald reviewer Paul Casserly called it a “great, gritty crime show”. Harry was notable for using unsubtitled Samoan in primetime.

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Harry - This is Personal (First Episode)

2013, Producer - Television

This first episode of this 2013 crime drama begins with a meth-fuelled bank heist gone very wrong. Harry is a Samoan-Kiwi detective (played by Oscar Kightley, a million miles away from Morningside) pursuing justice in South Auckland. Sam Neill, in his first role on a Kiwi TV series, plays Harry’s detective buddy. Off the case, Harry struggles with his teen daughter in the wake of his wife’s suicide. The Chris Dudman-directed series screened for a season on TV3. Broadcaster John Campbell tweeted: “Not remotely suitable for kids. But nor are many excellent things.”

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The Golden Hour

2012, Producer - Television

This documentary tells the story of NZ sport’s ‘golden hour’, when on 2 September 1960 in Rome, two Arthur Lydiard-coached running men won Olympic gold: 21-year-old Peter Snell in the 800m, and Murray Halberg in the 5000m shortly after. The outlier triumph tale mixes archive footage with recreations and candid interviews (Halberg’s battle with disability and doubt is poignant). NZ Herald critic Russell Baillie praised the result as “riveting” and “our Chariots of Fire”. It screened on TV prior to London 2012 and was nominated for a 2013 International Emmy Award. 

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How to Look at a Painting

2011, Producer - Television

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This is Not My Life

2010, Executive Producer - Television

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Reluctant Hero

2008, Writer, Director, Producer - Television

In 2007 Willie Apiata, of the NZ Army's elite SAS unit, was awarded the Victoria Cross for carrying a wounded soldier to safety while under fire in Afghanistan. This documentary had exclusive access to Corporal Apiata, from the moment he was told about the VC to his decision a few weeks later to gift the medal to the nation. The shy soldier struggles to deal with his sudden celebrity, and military bosses have to cope with the dual demand of handling media interest in the VC win while still keeping the work of the SAS relatively secret.

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NZSAS: First Among Equals

2007, Writer, Producer, Director - Television

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Million Dollar Tumour

2006, Producer - Television

In Million Dollar Tumour Dave Bowman narrates the “very personal tale” of his battle with cancer. The small town policeman was diagnosed with a brain tumour in 2005, aged 35. Bowman took on funding agency Pharmac and the bureaucracy of the public health system to try to get a treatment drug subsidised for himself and other sufferers. Although his efforts partly prevailed, Bowman died in mid 2006, after this Inside New Zealand documentary screened. Directed by Dave Crerar (Here to Stay), Million Dollar Tumour won Best Documentary at the 2006 Qantas TV Awards.  

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Police College (Episode One)

2006, Producer - Television

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Out of the Blue

2006, Producer - Film

In November 1990, misfit loner David Gray (played by Matthew Sunderland) murdered 13 of his neighbours in the seaside town of Aramoana near Dunedin. His rampage lasted 22 hours before he was gunned down by police. Out of the Blue is a dramatised re-enactment of these traumatic events. Directed by Robert Sarkies and co-written with Graeme Tetley, this gut-wrenching film did respectable box office and was lauded at 2008's Qantas Film and TV Awards, winning most feature categories, including best film and screenplay. Warning: excerpt contains realistic gun violence.

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The Understudy

2005, Producer - Television

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The Way We Were

1996 - 1998, Producer, Director - Television