Bliss

Th' Dudes, Music Video, 1980

With a chorus to do any football terrace proud, the final single from Th’ Dudes (featuring Dave Dobbyn, Peter Urlich and Ian Morris) became one of the great Kiwi drinking songs. It was actually written in Sydney to parody hard-drinking pub crowds; the lyrics namecheck Sydney landmarks (The Coogee, The Cross) and delights unavailable back home (Spanish shoes, falafel). Shot in Wellington's booze barn-like Cricketers’ Arms, the video showcases the excitement of the band’s live show, and offers a snapshot of bar culture in early 80s New Zealand.

S.O.S

Gin Wigmore, Music Video, 2008

The unlikely combination of 1930s Hollywood and a Kiwi town hall knees up work delightfully in this clip from Australian production luminaries Straighty180. Wigmore's croaky charms are augmented by crowd-sourced choreography, and the most delicate of ukulele performances from a burly strummer gets the dance-floor moving. Lovely!

You Gotta Know

Supergroove, Music Video, 1994

Black, white and red exuberance abound in this award-winning music video from Supergroove. The band's funk-heavy live performance is intercut with scenes of the band clowning around at the Otara Market, on a Three Kings volcano, and crowded into the back of an open-top VW. The hairstyle of vocalist and future Cambridge classics scholar Karl Steven — shaved, aside from an extended fringe arrangement at the front — is a relic from another era. An alternative video made for the same song revolves around the band doing everything backwards.

Humble Punk Rock

Grayson Gilmour, Music Video, 2010

This was created as part of the 2010 creative collaborations edition of the Orcon Great Blend. The fanciful clip is a suitable match for the moody minimalism of the track. Planned and shot in a day it achieves an eerily cohesive finish, belying the fact director Jesse Taylor Smith hadn’t heard the song prior to filming, and Gilmour was in the dark as to shooting plans. The ‘actors’ were crowd-sourced and harassed into hair and make-up; from there the footage was developed, the song was 'properly' recorded and all the pieces thrown into place – UFOs included.

Fingerpops

Garageland, Music Video, 1996

Stumble into a mid 1990s underground bar and a lime green room, in this early Garageland video. After singer Jeremy Eade lines up another shot, the camera moves woozily elsewhere to take in the secondhand sofas, as the band rock out. Garageland made international inroads with their spikey, sweet sound. Flying Nun's Paul McKessar remembers their popularity. “My favourite moment was the Smashing Pumpkins support at the Supertop with the whole crowd singing ‘Fingerpops’. Co-directors Peter Bell and Carla Rotondo also directed Garageland video Beelines to Heaven.

Flicker

Fetus Productions, Music Video, 1985

The feverish complexity of Flicker is captured in this video collaboration between Fetus Productions' Jed Town and director Alex Proyas (The Crow, Dark City, promos for INXS, Crowded House, Mike Oldfield). The pair deliver a terrifically haunting clip, skillfully creating an intensely serpentine work full of dark frames and layered, unnerving images. Yikes.  

Flow

Kora, Music Video, 2007

Kora’s formation in Wellington in 2002 saw them associated with the city’s burgeoning dub-roots scene, but the Whakatane brothers’ music mix also extends to elements of funk, soul, rock, house and metal. That genre-defying diversity is in evidence on this track from their debut album, as a relaxed reggae intro gives way to stomping electronica-tinged funk rock. This performance video shot in Auckland at AUT’s Vesbar captures the band in their live element, complete with a crowd-pleasing freeze that turns them into a 3D tableau, and strobe-lit climax.

Dream

Lydia Cole, Music Video, 2015

Lydia Cole's understated yet heartfelt breakup song is accompanied by an equally understated music video. Cole performs in a darkened room which is home to a number of mirrors...plus a man and a woman (possibly the woman who got the guy?). 'Dream' was one of five finalists for the 2016 APRA Silver Scroll songwriting award, after making it through from an original list of 20. The song was released ahead of Cole's second album The Lay of the Land; after she launched a crowd-funding campaign in September 2015 to help fund it, her target was met in only five days.

Her Hairagami Set

The Brunettes, Music Video, 2007

This award-winning puppetry/comic book creation follows a put upon heroine enduring jibes from the cool crowd about her hairstyle. She resolves to rectify her situation using a new 'Hairagami Set'. The video was created by duo Trophy Wife (Ian and Rebecca Hart), who later revealed that the Hairzilla monster was a late addition, after US record label Sub Pop felt uncomfortable with "school shooting imagery". The clip won Best Music Video at the 2008 Vodafone NZ Music Awards. Check out the true to life puppets of band members Jonathan Bree and Heather Mansfield.