Rise Up

Opensouls, Music Video, 2006

Featuring a marine odyssey told through cutout-style animation, this Paul Hershell-directed music video compliments a chilled out tune from Opensouls’ acclaimed debut album Kaleidoscope. After a nature focused opening, the cheerful demeanour begins to dissipate as the soft red textures become more harsh. A pirate attack sees the video descending below the waves, introducing a world of calming blue. But submarines and sea mines abound, mirroring the song’s relaxed exterior which hides the energetic trumpets underneath. 

The Best for You

Age Pryor, Music Video, 2004

Mixing nostalgic home movie style footage with images of Age Pryor looking slightly melancholic, this video dates from the singer's second solo release, City Chorus, released in 2003. Pryor went on to co-found the Wellington International Ukelele Orchestra, and contribute songs and vocals to ensemble album The Woolshed Sessions. 

Singing in My Soul

Fly My Pretties, Music Video, 2004

This black and white performance music video is taken from  debut album Live at Bats (2004), back when the plan was for the Fly My Pretties ensemble to be a one-off project. Written and sung by Age Pryor — with vocal help from Tessa Rain — the gentle folk song is enhanced by simple but effective shooting, and attentive use of split-screen editing. The track was recorded in Wellington's Bats Theatre.

One Day

Opshop, Music Video, 2007

The third single from Opshop’s triple platinum-selling second album Second Hand Planet reached number three on the NZ singles chart, and became the theme song for a string of heart string-pulling NZ Post adverts with its lyric “one day / you’ll realise how much you have me”. Director Luke Sharpe’s video has the band in semi-darkness, accompanied only by a smoke machine and the odd dreamy projection. Lead singer and New Zealand’s Got Talent host Jason Kerrison’s vocals are harmonised by Dianne Swann from When the Cat’s Away and The Bads.  

Super Gyration

The Datsuns, Music Video, 2000

'Super Gyration' was the first release for Waikato band The Datsuns, initially as a vinyl only 7” 45. Director Greg Page had to abandon his initial concept the night before the shoot, when he lost his location. Instead, he prevailed on an Onehunga panel beater’s shop and filmed the band rocking out and in their element. Cars were provided by the Ooga Boys hot rod club. They weren’t huge fans of Datsun automobiles and took some persuading, but the band’s music won them over. In a clip full of cars the only Datsun is on the single’s picture sleeve, on a dishwasher in the kitchen.    

Bursting Through

Bic Runga, Music Video, 1998

The second single from singer-songwriter Bic Runga's critically acclaimed debut album Drive, 'Bursting Through' is a spare but quietly insistent plea for emotional warmth. The video finds Runga elegantly coiffeured and styled in a white gown with a black guitar. The setting favours bleached whites and pale blues, and water surrounds her in a myriad of forms — dripping, pooled, condensed. But there’s the promise of sunlight and succour as well. Co-director Melanie Bridge would later help found multi-national commercials company The Sweet Shop.

Swing

Savage, Music Video, 2005

This infectious hip hop hit marked Savage’s solo debut, after his previous recordings with The Deceptikonz. A NZ chart-topper for five weeks, it went platinum in the USA (helped by its placement in Hollywood comedy Knocked Up and as the soundtrack for its DVD menu). For her video, director Sophie Findlay created a laundromat from scratch in an empty Otahuhu shop. In it she intersperses an undersized Savage and 70s-themed dancing girls with darker, more contemporary hip hop imagery. It must be all a dream, because the pimply palagi teenager is the tough guy.    

Welcome Home

Dave Dobbyn, Music Video, 2005

A heartwarming tribute to the spirit of togetherness, this Dave Dobbyn classic celebrates Aotearoa's many colours. Forklift drivers, shop owners, children and (then) asylum seeker Ahmed Zaoui lend weight to the welcome, as does the declaration at the end: "We come from everywhere. Speak peace and welcome home." Taken from 2005 album Available Light, Dobbyn's song became an unofficial anthem to many expats. Dobbyn went on to sing it at the 2006 launch of a NZ memorial in London, at concerts after the 2019 Christchurch mosque attacks — and in te reo version 'Nau Mai Rā'.

Dominion Road

The Mutton Birds, Music Video, 1992

Don McGlashan has never been scared to use New Zealand place names in his songs, and never more so than here on the Mutton Birds’ classic debut. His imagined back story for a man he saw from a bus window one day — a resident of the fabled “half way house, half way down Dominion Road” — is a tale of loss and redemption set on one of Auckland’s busiest arterial routes. Fane Flaws directed the shots of the band, while the colour footage (showing glimpses of forgotten shops and a less multi-cultural streetscape than can be seen today) was shot by Leon Narbey.

Wandering Eye

Fat Freddy's Drop, Music Video, 2005

Set in a Grey Lynn fish'n'chip shop, this clip delivers a killer kai moana concept, when it's revealed that the greasy takeaway is merely a front for the club downstairs. Winner of Best Music Video at the 2006 Vodafone NZ Music Awards, the video features a host of cameos in addition to the members of Fat Freddy's Drop: including Danielle Cormack, Ladi6, John Campbell and Carol Hirschfeld. It was directed by Mark 'Slave' Williams, sometime MC for the band. The track was part of Fat Freddy's first studio album Based on a True Story, one of the biggest-selling in Kiwi history.