Mātai Smith

Presenter, Reporter [Rongowhakaata, Ngāi Tāmanuhiri, Ngāti Kahungunu ki Te Wairoa]

Mātai Smith began his screen career reporting on Marae. He was a long-running host of pioneering te reo children's show Pūkana and later co-hosted breakfast TV staple Good Morning (where he introduced te reo, and was hypnotised). Smith fronted popular Māori TV talent quest Homai Te Pakipaki, winning Best Presenter at the 2012 NZ TV Awards. He is currently Native Affairs’ Australian correspondent.

Waihoroi Shortland

Actor, Writer [Ngāti Hine, Te Aupouri]

A veteran figure in Māori broadcasting, Waihoroi Shortland has also been an actor (Rain of the Children, Boy), scriptwriter (Crooked Earth) and Māori advisor (The Piano). In 2003 he won the NZ Film Award for Best Actor, after playing Shylock in movie The Māori Merchant of Venice. In 2015 he became the first chair of Te Mātāwai, the organisation charged with revitalising te reo on behalf of Māori. 

Nicole Hoey

Producer

Cinco Cine founder Nicole Hoey began her screen career in commercials, then produced 1995 telemovie Dead Certs. By the 21st century Cinco Cine was starting on te reo heavy youth show Pūkana, which was nominated for Best Children’s TV Programme at the New Zealand TV Awards in 2002. Hoey has continued to work on te reo broadcasting, and also produced TV movie Nights In The Gardens Of Spain.

Kōtuku Tibble

Broadcaster, Teacher [Ngāti Porou, Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Tuwharetoa, Te Whānau-ā-Apanui]

Broadcaster, teacher and Māori language advocate Kōtuku Tibble spent his life championing te reo. Tibble boasted a diverse CV  — he had a hand in the launch of te reo pop group, Aaria, taught around the North Island for 28 years, and presented shows for television and radio over more than a decade. The father of two passed away on 24 September 2017, at the age of 53.     

Whai Ngata

Producer, Reporter, Executive [Ngāti Porou, Te Whānau ā Apanui]

Whai Ngata worked in Māori broadcasting at Television New Zealand for 25 years, a period when the quantity of Māori broadcasting underwent a major expansion. Starting as a reporter, he rose to become TVNZ's general manager of Māori Programming, a post he held from 1994 until retiring in 2008. Ngata was named an Officer of the Order of New Zealand Merit in 2007. He passed away on 3 April 2016.

Karen Te O Kahurangi Waaka-Tibble

Producer [Te Arawa, Mataatua, Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Tūhourangi-Ngāti Wāhiao, Ngāti Whakaue, Ngāti Pūkeko]

Twenty-five plus years spent working in Māori tourism proved valuable when Karen Te O Kahurangi Waaka-Tibble moved into television production. The Rotorua local was used to managing people and events, so making TV shows was a natural fit. Now general manager for Kura Productions, Waaka-Tibble has produced nine seasons of children's te reo show Pūkoro, and was line producer on movie Mt Zion.  

Tainui Stephens

Producer, Director, Presenter [Te Rarawa]

Tainui Stephens is a Kiwi screen taonga. Since joining Koha as a reporter in 1984, he has brought many Māori stories to television, and worked on everything from Marae to Māori Television's version of It's in the Bag. Among the notable documentaries he has directed are Māori Battalion doco March to Victory and award-winning show The New Zealand Wars. He was a producer on Vincent Ward film Rain of the Children.

Mihingarangi Forbes

Presenter, Reporter, Producer [Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Paoa]

Award-winning journalist Mihingarangi Forbes has spent 20+ years working in television, reporting in both te reo and English. Feilding-raised Forbes began her career as an intern on Te Karere, before moving to One News, Campbell Live, 20/20 and Native Affairs. She resigned from Māori Television in 2015, claiming she'd lost control over her stories, and began presenting Three's new current affairs show The Hui in 2016. 

Olly Ohlson

Presenter [Ngāti Whare]

Olly Ohlson is a pioneer of Māori language and Māori content on local television. As longtime presenter on daily children's show After School, his catchphrase “Keep cool till after school” (with accompanying sign language) was known to a generation of New Zealanders.

Haunui Royal

Director, Executive [Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Tamatērā, Ngāti Raukawa ki te Tonga, Ngāti Hine, Nga Puhi ki Te Tai Tokerau]

For more than 20 years, Haunui Royal has been driven by the desire to be part of a vibrant Māori voice in broadcasting. The director turned executive got his break at TVNZ in 1988, before directing everything from a long line of documentaries (The Truth about Māori), to entertainment (Havoc and Newsboy's Sellout Tour). Later he spent seven years as General Manager of Programming at Māori Television.