Out of Darkness, Out of India

Television, 2007 (Full Length)

Directed by Owen Hughes, this piece for arts show Artsville explores the feeling of being caught between cultures. Painter Prakash Patel grew up as an Indian in conservative 1970s Wanganui. As a Kiwi he didn’t feel Indian yet he didn’t belong in Wanganui either - ‘What am I doing here?’ In 2006 he was awarded a Creative New Zealand Residency at the Sanskriti Campus in New Delhi. Out of Darkness, Out of India follows Prakash on his journey from discomfort to discovery.

The Humble Force

Television, 1980 (Full Length)

Filmed on a 15,000 km journey through China in 1979, this documentary captures a country in transition: one where billboards are emerging on the streets of Shanghai, while commune workers still toil in the countryside. The film compiles images of people and landscape to observe China's then-recent emergence from the repressive Cultural Revolution; including memories from long-term resident, Kiwi Rewi Alley. Named after a description by Alley of China, it was made alongside companion documentary: Gung Ho: Rewi Alley of China.   

Only Son

Short Film, 2010 (Full Length)

In Only Son Sydney (Josh Thomson from 7 Days) tries to court the girl of his dreams, but is hampered by unwanted advice from his dead father. This short comedy was made for — and won — the 2010 48 Hours filmmaking competition. The bawdy rom-com twist on the father-son relationship comes from prolific production team thedownlowconcept (7 Days, Pop Goes the Weasel and several 48 Hour successes). Only Son went on to be an upstart winner at the 2010 Qantas Awards, winning for best short and best screenplay — the first time a 48 Hour film had done so.

Illustrious Energy

Film, 1988 (Excerpts)

Illustrious Energy sees Chan and his older mate Kim prospecting for gold in 1890s Otago. Marooned until they can pay off their debts and return to China; they’ve been fruitlessly working their claim for 12 and 27 years respectively. Chan faces racism, isolation, extreme weather, threatening surveyors, opium dens and a circus romance. The renowned feature-directing debut of cinematographer Leon Narbey provides a poetic evocation of the Chinese settler experience; especially vivid are Central’s natural details — desolate schist and tussock lands, rasping crickets.