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Bread & Roses

Film, 1993 (Excerpts)

Released to mark 100 years of women's suffrage in New Zealand, Bread & Roses tells the story of pioneering trade unionist, politician and feminist Sonja Davies (1923 - 2005) who rose to prominence in the 1940s and 50s. Directed by Gaylene Preston and co-written by Graeme Tetley, the acclaimed three-hour film was created for a dual cinema/television release. Australian actor Geneviève Picot (Davies) and Mick Rose (as her husband) were awarded for their roles at 1994’s TV Awards. This excerpt sees Davies take direct action to protest closure of a Nelson railway.

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The Making of Bread and Roses

Television, 1993 (Full Length)

Mini-series Bread and Roses recreates the early days of trade unionist and politician Sonja Davies. Behind the scenes, the $4 million production required 175 speaking parts, and dozens of sets — many built from plywood, “to make something out of nothing”. This documentary follows director Gaylene Preston and producer Robin Laing from preproduction and filming a dance scene in Wellington Town Hall, to (old-fashioned film) editing. Meanwhile lead actor Geneviève Picot talks about the challenges of portraying a character who often kept her vulnerabilities hidden. 

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Alison Holst Cooks - Bread and Cheese

Television, 1984 (Full Length Episode)

In this short clip, sponsored by the New Zealand Dairy Board, cookbook queen Alison Holst provides a rundown on four easy meals that can be made out of bread and cheese. Made long before the more hyperactive Food In a Minute, Holst’s calm charisma gently talks us through the ins and outs of mouse traps, cheese rolls, mini pizzas and, of course, cheese toasties. A surprise bell from the microwave threatens to throw Holst off her stride, but then a dive into her rich supply of kitchen tips helps her get things right back on track.

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Loose Enz - That Bread Should Be So Dear

Television, 1982 (Full Length)

TVNZ's Loose Enz series was a series of 12 stand-alone dramas made in the early 80s. This episode, directed by television trailblazer Caterina De Nave, is a drama about married life featuring neighboring couples with two different relationship dynamics. Mary is trying to set off into the working world now that her kids have grown up, much to the irritation of her controlling husband David. Next door, Duncan and Judith have a modern, more equal, relationship. Increasingly dark, this episode is a trenchant criticism of patriarchical mores of the time.

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Collection

Rugby

Curated by NZ On Screen team

This collection celebrates rugby in New Zealand as it has been seen onscreen: from classic bios and tour docos, to social history, dramas and protest. In the accompanying backgrounders, broadcaster Keith Quinn looks at the on air history of rugby in NZ; and playwright David Geary asks if rugby is a religion, and argues it is a good test of character.

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Hunger for the Wild - Series One, Episode Two (Whanganui River wild pig)

Television, 2006 (Full Length Episode)

This award-winning series took Wellington chefs Al Brown and Steve Logan out of their fine-dining restaurant on a mission to experience the local in 'locally sourced' kai. In this episode Al and Steve head to Tangahoe, up the Whanganui River, looking for wild pig with a couple of good keen men — Baldy and Moon. Logie's with the dogs on the boar hunt; while Al's on veges at the markets, before hitching a flying fox ride to sample some freshly baked organic kumara bread en route up river. The bush tucker result? Cider braised pork belly with kumara and corn mash.

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Weekly Review No. 337 - Wheat Problem 1948

Short Film, 1948 (Full Length)

This post-war Weekly Review urges Kiwi farmers to grow more wheat in the face of a world shortage, and out of a patriotic duty to help Britain. Graphic images of global poverty (especially in the final minutes) are counterpointed with NZ wealth and agricultural ingenuity. The film features scientist Otto Frankel, who introduced new wheat varieties that were better suited to the local climate. This was director Alun Falconer's only on-screen credit while working at the National Film Unit. He and Roger Mirams soon left to found pioneering company Pacific Film Unit (later Pacific Films). 

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The Big Art Trip - Series Two, Episode Six

Television, 2002 (Full Length Episode)

This second season Big Art Trip episode opens in Wairarapa with hosts Fiona McDonald and Douglas Lloyd-Jenkins marvelling at sculptor Harry Watson’s carved statuettes. In Masterton they visit the Aratoi Museum and drop in on painter Robin White, who discusses her paintings, talks about the years she spent in Kiribati, and about the World War II POW camp in Featherston. In Wellington they catch up with first series' co-host, screenwriter Nick Ward, visit toast mosaic artist Maurice Bennett, watch Katherine Smyth throw a pot, and meet composer John Psathas.

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Bungy Fishing - Instant Kiwi Attitude

Commercial, 1989 (Full Length)

This classic 1989 TV commercial promoted the NZ Lotteries Commission’s new ‘scratch and win’ cards. The goad to gamble was based on the question: “Instant Kiwi attitude: have you got it?” as personified by a bungy-jumping fisherman. From Saatchi & Saatchi’s then-high-flying Wellington office, the promo is iconic of the big budget era of NZ ad making. It was directed by Flying Fish co-founder Lee Tamahori, who also helmed high profile promos for Fernleaf and Steinlager before making his movie directing debut with Once Were Warriors (1994).

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Kia Ora Bonjour (Part One)

Television, 1990 (Full Length)

Howard Morrison goes to France for the first time in this two-part Kiwi production, made to mark the French bicentenary. Morrison's tour of French culture begins on the Champs-Élysées for Bastille Day, then ranges from Napoleon to Notre Dame, with visits to the Musée de l’Homme to see taonga, crepe-flipping, and Parisian cabaret (where he belts out a song onstage). When the Māori leaves Metro range, it’s fishing in Neuvic and ‘Pokarekare Ana’ accompanied by accordion. In Corrèze he meets a Kiwi and uses a minitel (an early version of the world wide web).