Pictorial Parade No. 35

Short Film, 1955 (Full Length)

The inventions of Bill Hamilton dominate this instalment of long-running cinema series Pictorial Parade. Hamilton tests his pioneering jet boat on Canterbury's Ohau River, while new inventions including a hydraulic digger are put to the test on the hard rocky soils at Irishman Creek. Meanwhile on the production line in Christchurch, engineers and machinists are hard at work getting graders and loaders in top working order. Also featured is a new diesel railcar on New Zealand’s train network, and the crew of the HMNZS Hawea and HMNZS Black Prince training in the Cook Strait.

Country Calendar - Billy Riddell, Drover

Television, 1975 (Full Length Episode)

This  Country Calendar episode profiles Billy Riddell, one of the few remaining drovers who was still moving herds the old fashioned way in the mid 1970s: “on the hoof” (the art of droving was being supplanted by rail and livestock trucks). The episode accompanies Riddell on a ‘drive’, as he moves a herd of cattle along the East Coast. Riddell’s narration recalls stampedes, river crossings, losing dogs and stock out to sea, the joys of butter, and why townies shouldn’t be on the roads: “the roads were there before cars were even blimmin' thought of”. He also reflects on a drover’s life.

Pictorial Parade No. 200 - Kb Country

Short Film, 1968 (Full Length)

Train enthusiast David Sims captured the dying days of steam trains in this 1968 National Film Unit short. It features arresting images of a Kb class locomotive billowing steam as it tackles the Southern Alps, en route from Canterbury to the West Coast. Kb Country was released in Kiwi cinemas in January 1968, just months before the steam locomotives working the Midland Line were replaced by diesel-electrics. Sims earned his directing stripes with the film. As he writes in this background piece, making it involved a mixture of snow, joy and at least two moments of complete terror.

Scott Flyger

Editor

Auckland-raised Scott Flyger got his first big editing break on high profile documentary Rubber Gloves or Green Fingers, and went on to spend 12 years in London, where he cut a range of high profile dramas, comedies and documentaries. Now based in Christchurch, Flyger runs postproduction house Due South Films.

Andrea Bosshard

Director/Writer

Alongside partner Shane Loader, Andrea Bosshard makes and distributes films through indie filmmaking initiative Torchlight Films. Dominion Post critic Graeme Tuckett called the pair's second feature Hook, Line and Sinker “likeable, admirable and hugely enjoyable”. Third feature The Great Maiden's Blush was released to acclaim — and awards — in 2016. 

Jacob Bryant

Cinematographer

Intrepid cinematographer Jacob Bryant has shot everywhere from Iraq and Afghanistan to the mean streets of Auckland (Super City). His work with leading documentary makers has been nominated for multiple screen awards. An episode of TV show Ends of the Earth shot in Afghanistan won Bryant a 2007 Qantas Award; he also shared a Documentary Edge gong for filming Finding Mercy in Zimbabwe.

Geoff Jamieson

Grip

Geoff Jamieson was working as a mechanic in Queenstown when he was asked to help out on landmark 70s television series Hunters's Gold. So began a busy career as a camera grip on a run of classic TV dramas, as well as the ambitious shoots for movies The Quiet Earth and The Piano. Jamieson passed away on 24 May 2016.

David Sims

Director, Editor

There were times when the career of longtime National Film Unit director David Sims could have been cut short. Having survived close encounters with steam locomotives in mountainous terrain, he narrowly escaped being blown up, drowned and burnt alive at sea. Even filming a planned set-up on location had its hazards, as he found when his call of “action!” sent exploding rocks whistling by perilously close overhead.