Collection

Rugby

Curated by NZ On Screen team

This collection celebrates rugby in New Zealand as it has been seen onscreen: from classic bios and tour docos, to social history, dramas and protest. In the accompanying backgrounders, broadcaster Keith Quinn looks at the on air history of rugby in NZ; and playwright David Geary asks if rugby is a religion, and argues it is a good test of character.

Collection

The Matariki Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Celebrate iconic Māori television, film and music with this collection, in time for Māori New Year. Watch everything from haka to hip hop, Billy T to the birth of Māori Television. Two backgrounders by former TVNZ Head of Māori Programming Whai Ngata (Koha, Marae) look at Matariki, and the history of Māori programming on New Zealand television.   

Behind Our Planes

Short Film, 1942 (Full Length)

This wartime propaganda film from the NFU celebrates the role of women in the Air Force. Established in 1941 to free up men for other duties, more than 4,700 women served in the Women's Auxiliary Air Force during WWII. The film is also a recruitment vehicle. It shows WAAF members in traditional (for the time) roles such as sewing and typing. But more male-dominated jobs are being taken on as women are trained as metal workers, mechanics and drivers. And when they’re not working, the women relax by "knitting, drinking a cup of tea and talking."

Marae DIY - Rongomaraeroa-o-nga-hau e wha Marae (Series 11, Episode Three)

Television, 2015 (Full Length Episode)

This episode from the 11th season of the award-winning show sees presenters Te Ori Paki and Ria Hall and company makeover a unique marae: Rongomaraeroa-o-nga-hau e wha. The marae in Waiouru serves members of the NZ Army — aka Ngāti Tūmatauenga — and the local community. Capturing the role of taha Māori in the Defence Force, the makeover enlists 140 new Army recruits, locals, whānau, hapu, ex-military personnel from all over New Zealand, and Victoria Cross recipient Willie Apiata. This season saw Marae DIY shift from Māori Television to TV3.

The Regular Soldier

Short Film, 1966 (Full Length)

This Army recruiting film was made while New Zealand was still involved in the Vietnam War. While its emphasis is on the various trades, such as carpentry, engineering and radio operation, which can be learned in the army, it doesn't shy away from the purely military aspects. Soldiers are trained in unarmed combat, parachuting and jungle warfare. Exercises at the Waiouru Army Camp involving armoured support are also featured. Women are included, but in 1966 they fulfil roles in signals and nursing to free up men for combat duties.

Memories of Service 2 - Howard Monk

Web, 2016 (Full Length)

Howard Monk was just 15 when he joined the army, turning 16 during basic training. When the Air Force came looking for recruits he was reluctant to join, despite the extra one shilling and sixpence per day. But he was recruited anyway, and discovered he was a natural pilot. Clearly a natural storyteller as well, Monk enjoyed his service, flying fighters in the Pacific theatre late in the war. But by then the Japanese had few serviceable aircraft to fly, and to his regret he never engaged in aerial combat.

A Week of It - Series One, Episode Three

Television, 1977 (Full Length Episode)

A Week of It was a pioneering political satire series. This episode from the first series tackles topical issues — many of which will seem bewildering to a 21st Century audience. Ken Ellis and David McPhail discuss the great NZ work of fiction and Jon Gadsby presents Māori news. Annie Whittle and McPhail act out how babies are made; there's a Justice Department recruitment film; interviewer (and future royal PR man) Simon Walker is sent up; the sex habits of the 1977 Lions rugby tour are covered, as is wisdom of sheilas on racehorses. McPhail writes about the show's launch here. 

Artist

Breaks Co-Op

Zane Lowe (formerly of Urban Disturbance) and Hamish Clark formed Breaks Co-op in 1997, releasing a debut album Roofers which fused hip-hop and downbeat electronica. They recruited vocalist Andy Lovegrove in 2004 and re-emerged with The Sound Inside which introduced acoustic guitars to their mix and included the summertime anthem 'The Otherside' (Single of the Year at the 2005 NZ Music Awards). Lowe's subsequent emergence as one of the stars of British radio has limited his involvement with the band and he was unavailable for their 2014 reunion.

Stop, Drop & Roll

Mareko, Music Video, 2003

Prolific music video director Sophie Findlay offers a humourous take on all those army film and TV shows (Full Metal Jacket, Tigerland et al) with the bad-arse drill sergeant and badgered recruits. Commanding Officer Mareko barks orders to the beat to his troops, The Deceptikonz.

Artist

Golden Harvest

Comprising four Māori brothers and a white vocalist, Golden Harvest began in smalltown Morrinsville as the aptly-titled Brothers: Kevin, Gavin, Eru and Mervyn Kaukau. In the mid 70s they moved to Auckland, and recruited singer Karl Gordon. As Golden Harvest, they played support for Bob Marley and ELO, and released a single, self-titled album in 1978. Heavier on stage than on record, they would come to be defined by their single top 10 hit: 'I Need Your Love'. By 1980 the band were no more.