Te Māori - A Celebration of the People and their Art

Short Film, 1985 (Full Length)

After kicking off with 'Poi-E' and the opening of landmark exhibition Te Māori in New York, this documentary sets out to summarise the key elements of Māori culture and history in a single hour. Narrator Don Selwyn ranges across past and (mid 80s) present: from early Māori settlement and moa-hunting, to the role of carvings in "telling countless stories". There are visits to Rotorua's Māori Arts and Crafts Institute and a Sonny Waru-led course aimed at getting youth in touch with their Māoritanga. The interviews include Napi Waaka and the late Sir James Hēnare.   

The Makutu on Mrs Jones

Short Film, 1983 (Full Length)

A culture clash story by Witi Ihimaera inspired this comic drama, which marked the directing debut of screen veteran Larry Parr. Set in the mist-shrouded Taranaki hamlet of Whangamomona in the 1940s, the short film focuses on the conflict between a local tohunga, Mr Hohepa (Sonny Waru) and feisty Pākehā Mrs Jones (Annie Whittle) — as viewed by the young boy who helps deliver her mail and groceries (Julian Arahanga, in his screen debut). The locals think Hohepa has placed a makutu (or curse) on Mrs Jones. But could more basic human emotions be at work?

Mauri

Film, 1988 (Excerpts)

When she made Mauri, Merata Mita became the first Māori woman to write and direct a dramatic feature. Mauri (meaning life force), is loosely set around a love triangle and explores cultural tensions, identity, and changing ways of life in a dwindling East Coast town. As with Barry Barclay film Ngāti, Mauri played a key role in the burgeoning Māori screen industry. The crew numbered 33 Māori and 20 Pākehā, including interns from Hawkes Bay wānanga. Kiwi art icon Ralph Hotere was production designer; the cast included Zac Wallace (star of Utu) and Māori activist Eva Rickard.

Interview

Julian Arahanga: From acting in Once Were Warriors to directing Songs from the Inside...

Interview, Camera and Editing – Andrew Whiteside

Actor turned producer/director Julian Arahanga made his screen debut at age 11, starring alongside Annie Whittle in short film The Makutu on Mrs Jones. He shot to fame playing novice gang member Nig Heke in landmark movie Once Were Warriors, then went on to act in a number of films including Broken English. Since setting up his own production company Awa Films, Arahanga has directed and produced TV series Songs from the Inside and acclaimed documentary Turangaarere: The John Pohe Story.

Julian Arahanga

Actor, Director [Ngāti Raukawa,Te Ati Haunui ā Pāpārangi]

Julian Arahanga shot into the public eye in 1994's Once Were Warriors, playing the son who becomes a gang-member. He followed it with a starring role in cross-cultural romance Broken English. Since then Arahanga has continued a prolific career working in front of, and increasingly behind the camera - including as producer and director on Māori Television series Songs from the Inside.

Chelsea Winstanley

Producer, Director [Ngāti Ranginui]

Chelsea Winstanley has produced a stellar run of short films: Meathead and Night Shift were selected for the Cannes Film Festival; Meathead won an award in Berlin. Later she was one of the producers of vampire movie What We Do in the Shadows, directed by her partner Taika Waititi, and Jemaine Clement, and Waititi's Jojo Rabbit. She also produced Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen, on pioneering Māori director Merata Mita, and was one of the team of Māori women behind acclaimed drama Waru. Her work as director includes a 2005 documentary on Tame Iti. She is sometimes credited as Chelsea Cohen.