Ready to Roll - opening titles

Television, 1975 (Excerpts)

The opening sequence of music show Ready to Roll is imprinted on the eyes and ears of many Kiwi music fans. The show jumped directly from the opening graphics to a quick rundown of the week's top 20 singles. Here are two of RTR's beloved openings: the late 70s version is scored to 1974 Commmodores instrumental 'Machine Gun'. In the 80s, Peter Blake's synth number had taken over from funk, and the colours favoured electric neon. The graphics owed a debt to the arcade computer games that followed Space Invaders. The week's featured acts came next, then the countdown. 

Radio with Pictures - Fane Flaws opening titles

Television, 1987 (Full Length)

By 1987 music show Radio with Pictures was 12 years old. RWP producer (and future boss of MTV Europe) Brent Hansen was looking for ways to inject some of the visual style now being exhibited by MTV. So he approached artist and musician Fane Flaws, and gave him carte blanche to create a new opening sequence. Animation was a new field for Flaws — but using the Eastern tinged, koto-driven composition ‘The Calamity Music’ (by his ex Crocodiles bandmate Peter Dasent) as his musical inspiration, Flaws created a unique and strikingly surreal piece that won three awards.

Grunt Machine - Opening Titles

Television, 1975 (Excerpts)

Two long versions and a short version of the titles for the late night rock show; and a first attempt at animation for Avalon graphic designer Mike Peebles who was just out of art school. Sensibility is horror meets underground comics with a touch of Monty Python - but Peebles was anxious to avoid existing imagery (excepting the Rolling Stones mouth for the "wah-wah" voice). The first features a voice somewhere between Vincent Price and Isaac Hayes, ending with the invocation "and buckets of blood, baby". The end of the second is more matter of fact. 

Radio with Pictures - Opening Titles

Television, 1984 (Excerpts)

This selection offers three variations on the opening titles for TVNZ's beloved 80s music show. The theme music is 'This Heaven' by Auckland synth pop act Marginal Era; the mid-80s can also be spotted in the pink colour choice and in the basic computer graphics. Variations among the three sequences lie in the contemporary and vintage artists chosen in the montages of video excerpts — but all are bookended by classic pop images of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones. 

Romper Room - Opening Titles

Television, 1975 (Excerpts)

Romper Room kept little 70s kids entertained while they waited for big brothers and sisters to come home from school. The format was imported to NZ from the US with these animated titles — all that remains of the show in the archives. The titles established the programme’s bee motif (carried through to Do Bee and Don’t Bee who were used to model correct and incorrect behaviour). Once the bee had bounced off the jack in a box, Miss Yvonne and her fellow presenters entertained with songs and stories — and looked through the “magic mirror” at the audience at home.

Collection

The Most Legendary NZ TV Moments

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Forget who shot JR or what was under the hatch ... where were you when Thingee's eye popped out, 'O' was for 'awesome', or Bob "stormed out of the bracken like a yeti" to bop Rod in the 'Tumble in Taupō'? From Wainuiomata to Guatemala this Top 10 presents the most viewed clips from the previous NZ On Screen Legendary Moments collections (in descending order). 

Collection

NZ On Screen's Top 10 for 2015

Curated by NZ On Screen team

NZ On Screen’s Top 10 most viewed titles of 2015 features two All Blacks, a pair of animated favourites, a number of guitars, the debut episode of Outrageous Fortune, and a documentary about moko. Check out the top 10 list below, and find out more about the top 10 here.   

Collection

2016's Most Viewed

Curated by Kathryn Quirk

Month by month, this collection offers up NZ On Screen's most viewed clips for 2016. Alongside legendary adverts, the clips collection features talents lost to us over the year, from Ray Columbus to Martin Crowe and Bowie (via Flight of the Conchords). In this backgrounder, NZ On Screen Content Director Kathryn Quirk guides us through the list.    

Collection

Black Gold

Curated by NZ On Screen team

For a small country from the edge of the world, achievements on the Olympic stage are badges — silver fern-on-black — of national pride: precious moments where we gained notice (even if it was Mum’s anthem playing on the dais). This legacy collection draws on archive footage, some rarely seen, to celebrate the stories behind Kiwis going for gold.

Collection

Top 10 NZ Feature Films

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Arm yourself with jaffas and get set for debate: NZ On Screen has gone out on a limb and selected an all-time NZ feature film Top 10. Starring the icons of the Kiwi big screen — Blondini, Ada, Beth, Boy. Whet your appetite for our finest features via choice 10-minute excerpts of the movies. Cook the man some eggs, we're taking this Top 10 to Invercargill!