Paul Norris

Journalist, Executive

After 19 years working in news and current affairs at the BBC, Paul Norris returned to New Zealand in 1987 to lead TVNZ’s news and current affairs team during a period of major change (including the launch of hit show Holmes). Nine years later he left to head the NZ Broadcasting School in Christchurch. A widely respected and passionate advocate for public broadcasting, Norris died in February 2014.

Chris Dudman

Director, Writer

Kiwi Chris Dudman studied film at Ilam and London’s Royal College of Art; his graduation short was nominated for a student Oscar. After working on arts documentaries in the UK, Dudman returned to NZ in 1995. Since then he has directed drama shows (the high-rating Harry), documentaries (The Day that Changed My Life), attention-grabbing shorts (Choice Night), and a number of high profile ads for his company Robber’s Dog.

Peter Sinclair

Presenter

For three decades Peter Sinclair was one of New Zealand’s leading TV presenters. A radio announcer by training, he was the face of music television, fronting Let’s Go, C’mon and Happen Inn from 1964 to 1973. He reinvented himself as a quiz show host with Mastermind — and hosted telethons and beauty contests until the mid 90s. Sinclair returned to radio and wrote an online column until his death in August 2001.

Andrew Szusterman

Executive

After studies in radio broadcasting and English literature — and a stint as a radio DJ — Andrew Szusterman went on his OE, and ended up as Music Director of the UK branch of MTV. Back in New Zealand, he helped launch youth music channel C4, and rose up the MediaWorks ranks to become the group’s Chief Content Officer, curating content across television, radio and digital. 

Neil Roberts

Producer

Neil Roberts discovered that he loved making television programmes while working as a parliamentary journalist. In the mid 1980s he founded independent production company Communicado, whose staff grew to more than 60. Later Roberts oversaw a period of change at Television New Zealand, during a short stint as the organisation's Television Manager. He died of cancer on 8 November 1998.

Dairne Shanahan

Reporter, Producer

Pioneering current affairs reporter Dairne Shanahan brought social issues like abortion, transsexuality and poverty into the national conversation. Her credits include documentary Women in Power - Indira Gandhi, and current affairs shows Gallery, Close Up, Sunday and 60 Minutes in New Zealand, The Mike Willesee Show in Australia and W5 in Canada.

John Anderson

Director

John Anderson got busy directing a run of television dramas in the 1980s, including award-winning Polynesian road movie Mark ll, and two of the final works by playwright Bruce Mason. The onetime actor reinvented himself as a documentary filmmaker in the 90s, then relocated to Kiribati, where he worked on more than 400 films covering everything from climate change to dance. Anderson died in Kiribati on 19 August 2016.    

Olly Ohlson

Presenter [Ngāti Whare]

Olly Ohlson is a pioneer of Māori language and Māori content on local television. As longtime presenter on daily children's show After School, his catchphrase “Keep cool till after school” (with accompanying sign language) was known to a generation of New Zealanders.

Kerry Smith

Presenter, Actor

Kerry Smith's broadcasting career crossed the gamut: from TV continuity announcer, to playing sharp-tongued deputy editor Magda McGrath on Gloss, to presenting That's Fairly Interesting and home improvement show Changing Rooms. Smith also did many years as a radio host. She died on 20 April 2011, after a battle with cancer.

Paul Oremland

Director, Editor

Paul Oremland began directing a run of documentaries — and two feature films — during almost three decades based in London. Since returning home to New Zealand in 2009, he has continued to work as an editor and director, including on his 2017 autobiographical documentary 100 Men.