Waynne Williams

Camera

Veteran cameraman Waynne Williams, MNZM, has shot everything from the Vietnam War and French nuclear testing to the Christchurch quake, TV drama Pukemanu and Australian movie The Box. Over more than half a century, Williams has worked on over 10,000 news stories. The Christchurch-based lensman runs Port Hills productions with partner Anne Williams.

Marty Williams

Cinematographer

Cinematographer Marty Williams has aimed his camera at everything from landscapes to South Auckland Shakespearians The Black Friars. Williams was a prolific shooter for arts shows The Gravy and The Living Room, and shared a Best Cinematography Qantas Award for maverick lawyer documentary Lost in Wonderland. Sometimes credited as Martyn Williams, the South Seas Film and TV School graduate also framed gang member short Day Trip, and has done acclaimed work on adverts (often collaborating with director Mark Albiston) and music videos (Phoenix Foundation, Little Bushman).

Peter Williams

Presenter, Commentator

Veteran presenter Peter Williams has been working continuously in broadcasting ever since starting in radio as a teen. In 1979 he joined TV One as a sports show host and commentator, and went on to present from the Olympics and the Rugby World Cup. In the mid 90s the longtime cricket fan began a move into news; these days he reads the news on Breakfast and for primetime weekend bulletins on TV One. 

Guy Williams

Comedian

After a couple of years in stand-up comedy, Guy Williams "hit the jackpot" when he won the Dai’s Protégé Project competition — through Jono’s New Show — which saw him opening for Dai Henwood during the NZ International Comedy Festival. The following year Williams found himself working with Jono Pryor on his TV show The Jono Project. He took home the Billy T James comedy award in 2012 before joining radio station The Edge in 2014. He has since worked on various shows including a regular slot on Jono and Ben, narrating Come Dine With Me New Zealand, and hosting 2019 comedy news show New Zealand Today.

Tony Williams

Director

Tony Williams' contribution to the development of NZ film and television has been huge: his camerawork for John O'Shea's 60s feature-films, the nine ground-breaking documentaries he directed for Pacific Films, and his feature Solo, which helped launch the 70s new wave. After moving to Australia in 1980, Williams continued to wield a lively influence on our culture by directing many legendary commercials.

Brooke Williams

Actor

Christchurch-raised Brooke Williams took her first acting lessons at age four. Since graduating from drama school Toi Whakaari in 2004, she has won theatre awards for starring in Romeo and Juliet, and contributed a trio of memorable roles on New Zealand television: as Van's Russian bride on Outrageous Fortune, depressed Norse goddess Eva on The Almighty Johnsons, and well meaning PA Lana Jacobs on Shortland Street. After Australian miniseries Anzac Girls, Williams headed to North America in 2016 for time travel show 12 Monkeys, then played the brutal, "out of control" Snowflake on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

William Brandt

Actor, Writer

Actor and writer William Brandt was born to confuse. He has acted in films about writers, produced docos, and written novels about the film industry (The Book of the Film of the Story of My Life). Brandt began in acting, starring in comedy User Friendly and TV movie Undercover, and romancing Janet Frame in Angel at my Table. His reinvention as a writer began with 1992 play Verbatim, and includes episodes of Shortland Street.

William Grieve

Producer

William Grieve is a producer with more than two decades experience in documentaries, factual series, commercials and feature films. Grieve has worked extensively with filmmaker Bruce Morrison and entertainer Gary McCormick.

William Kircher

Actor, Producer

Since graduating from NZ Drama School, William Kircher has gone on to act in more than 100 plays, and at least 30 screen projects. Often cast as policeman (TV's Shark in the Park and movie Out of the Blue) or villain, Kircher has also worked on the other side of the camera. He was Bifur the dwarf in Peter Jackson's three-part adaptation of The Hobbit.

Michael Heath

Writer, Director, Producer

Though Michael Heath helped create a run of pioneering examples of the Kiwi cinema of unease, his contributions to our culture defy easy categorisation. His scripts include many films which have made a comfortable home between genres: children’s vampire tale Moonrise/Grampire, nostalgic Ronald Hugh Morrieson chiller The Scarecrow, Heath’s work with director Tony Williams, and his acclaimed song-cycle A Small Life.