James Cunningham

Animator, Director

James Cunningham made a name for himself after creating a run of stylish CGI-animated shorts — from 1997‘s Delf, and Cannes-selected Infection, through to acclaimed WWI tale Poppy. Now teaching 3D animation at Auckland’s Media Design School, Cunningham is also directing live action shorts, while developing a CGI feature with producing partner Paul Swadel.

Milo Cawthorne

Actor

Having acted since he was a teen — including an early role on TV series P.E.T. Detectives — Milo Cawthorne went on to starring roles in WWI mini-series When We Go To War and 2015 splatter comedy Deathgasm. Premiering at American festival South by Southwest, Deathgasm received rave reviews, and Cawthorne was nominated for Best Actor at the 2017 Moa Film Awards. He also starred in American feature Blood Punch and has worked on an extensive list of shorts in New Zealand and the United States.

Jane Galletly

Writer

Scriptwriter Jane Galletly entered the New Zealand television industry at a time when women writers were few and far between. Long drawn to the everyday lives of working people, she has devised and written award-winning drama (Moynihan, Pioneer Women), and worked on hours of classic soap, from Close to Home to EastEnders.  

Kerry Fox

Actor

Kerry Fox won international acclaim direct from drama school, after playing writer Janet Frame in Jane Campion's adaptation of An Angel at my Table. The role won her awards in Spain and New Zealand. After appearing in The Sinking of the Rainbow Warrior she departed Aotearoa for a busy international career, which has ranged from a lead role in Danny Boyle hit Shallow Grave to acclaimed WWI TV drama The Crimson Field. In 2001 she was named Best Actress at the Berlin Film Festival for Intimacy. Her other Kiwi roles include the "alpha female" head of drama in The Rehearsal, WWll drama The Last Tattoo and Mr Pip.

Keith Aberdein

Writer, Actor

Keith Aberdein is probably best known for playing the small-town policeman who arouses Bruno Lawrence's ire, in Kiwi screen classic Smash Palace. But his screen work covers almost every angle: from covering the Wahine disaster as a reporter, to directing, to writing scripts for some of the most ambitious television dramas of the 1970s.

Steve Locker-Lampson

Camera

After stints in the merchant navy and the British film industry, Steve Locker-Lampson began a new life in New Zealand in the 60s, heading the camera department at indie production house Pacific Films. The following decade he forged a reputation as one of the country's pioneer aerial cameramen, and worked behind the scenes on movies Solo and Smash Palace. Locker-Lampson passed away in October 2012.

Chris Dudman

Director, Writer

Kiwi Chris Dudman studied film at Ilam and London’s Royal College of Art; his graduation short was nominated for a student Oscar. After working on arts documentaries in the UK, Dudman returned to NZ in 1995. Since then he has directed drama shows (the high-rating Harry), documentaries (The Day that Changed My Life), attention-grabbing shorts (Choice Night), and a number of high profile ads for his company Robber’s Dog.

Tony Isaac

Director

Tony Isaac played a major hand in creating some of the key TV dramas of 1970s Kiwi television. He produced New Zealand's first continuing television drama Pukemanu, co-created Close to Home, our first soap, and was one of the main forces behind The Governor, arguably the most ambitious TV drama yet made on New Zealand soil. Isaac passed away in May 1986.

Maurice Gee

Writer

Maurice Gee, who was named an Arts Foundation icon in 2003, is one of New Zealand's most acclaimed writers. His work for the screen includes creating 80s kidult series The Fire-Raiser and The Champion. Gee's novels have also inspired a number of adaptations, notably classic sci-fi series Under the Mountain and movie In My Father's Den

Phil Wallington

Director, Journalist, Executive Producer

Veteran Australian-born producer Phil Wallington has 50 plus years of screen credits. A 1989 shift to New Zealand following 23 years at Australia’s ABC news saw him take on a run of executive producer roles on current affairs shows; he helped produce the controversial 1990 Frontline report on Labour Party campaign funding. The Top Shelf producer is also a regular media commentator.