Series

How's Life?

Television, 2001–2003

Hosted by Charlotte Dawson, How's Life? was an advice show whose panel of presenters included Jude Dobson, Suzanne Paul, Paul Henry, Marcus Lush and Christine Rankin (ex head of the Department of Work and Income). Responding to viewer enquiries, the panel offered help on relationships, family and more, from the serious (abuse, disease) to the light-hearted (the best way to sneeze in a restaurant). Almost 20 panelists featured over the Greenstone show's three seasons and 100+ episodes. The production crew received as many as 60 letters and emails a day.    

Series

Beauty and the Beast

Television, 1976–1985

Presented by broadcasting legend Selwyn Toogood, this beloved agony-aunt (and uncle!) discussion show screened on weekday afternoons, from 1976 to 1985. Toogood and four female panelists answered viewers' letters, taking on issues big and small. "We tackle every problem, be it incest, love or tatting" as panelist Liz Grant put it. Regular panellists included artist Shona McFarlane, Heather Eggleton, Catherine Saunders, and writer Johnny Frisbie.

Series

Dilemmas

Television, 1993–1994

Dilemmas sought to give advice to New Zealanders on how to negotiate their day to day lives. Hosted by Australian doctor Kerryn Phelps (and later by Marcus Lush) with a rotating panel of guests, the show covered everything from annoying neighbours to harassment and violence. Guests included Jude Dobson, Philip Alpers, Ginette McDonald and Genevieve Westcott. A regular media commentator in Australia on health matters, Phelps became the first woman elected to head the Australian Medical Association; in 2011 she received an Order of Australia, for services to medicine.  

Series

Ask Your Auntie

Television, 2004–2007

Ask Your Auntie was one of the most popular shows on Māori Television. This half hour studio-based chat series gained a solid reputation for straight up, no-nonsense wisdom from the agony 'Aunties'. Host Ella Henry is joined by a rotating panel of talented and wise wahine  including Mabel Wharekawa-Burt, Aroha Hathaway, Vanessa Rare, Veeshayne Patuwai, Kath Akuhata-Brown, Christina Asher, Whetu Fala, Ngawai Herewini and Rachel House.

Series

Tonight With Cathy Saunders

Television, 1985–1986

Tonight with Cathy Saunders saw host Saunders taking the reins solo, following short-lived talk show Saunders and Sinclair, which she co-presented with radio personality Geoff Sinclair. Both shows debuted in 1985. Among Saunders' guests were Māori activist Donna Awatere Huata, Australian actor Vince Martin, and female impersonator Marcus Craig (aka Diamond Lil). Saunders combined PR and marketing jobs with her television gigs— including time as a panelist on Selwyn Toogood's advice show Beauty and the Beast.

Series

Dig This

Television, 1975–1986

Dig This became New Zealand’s first national gardening show when it replaced a series of regional programmes in 1975 (among them Reg Chibnall's long-running Gardening). For 15 minutes, before the Sunday morning soccer highlights, presenter Eion Scarrow (who had honed his skills fronting the Auckland show since 1971) dirtied his hands in a garden created in the grounds of Avalon Studios in Lower Hutt. His advice was no-nonsense, and so was his wardrobe of jerseys, gumboots, overalls and towelling hats. The show allowed many trainee directors to develop their own craft.

Series

Sticky TV

Television, 2002–2017

Sticky TV was one of New Zealand's longest-running kids programmes, lasting 16 years. Aimed at preschoolers through to 12-year-olds, it introduced many emerging presenters, including future TV weatherman Sam Wallace, Kanoa Llloyd (The Project) and Erin Simpson (The Erin Simpson Show). Made by Pickled Possum Productions, Sticky TV broadcast on TV3, except for four years when it aired on Four. Segments included children handing out advice to other kids, mud fights, and contests involving singing, cooking, fashion and survival. The last episode screened on Christmas Day 2017.

Series

The Living Earth

Television, 1992–1994

Presented by the multi-skilled Annie Whittle (Go Girls, A Week of It) and the ebullient Dale Harvey (an American born radio host, columnist and environmental consultant) The Living Earth was a magazine style show aimed at those who love getting their hands dirty in the garden. The series featured famous private and public New Zealand gardens, interviews with keen gardeners from varied walks of life, and weekly competitions. The Living Earth offered practical advice for the beginner and the enthusiast, and explored wider environmental topics.

Series

Landmarks

Television, 1981

Landmarks was a major 10-part series that traced the history of New Zealand through its landscape, particularly the impact of human settlement and technology. The concept was modelled on the epic BBC series America. Here a bespectacled, Swannie-wearing geography professor, Kenneth B Cumberland, stands in for Alistair Cooke, interweaving science, history and sweeping imagery to tell the stories of the landscape's "complete transformation". It received a 1982 Feltex Award for Best Documentary and the donnish but game Cumberland became a household name.

Series

Jo Seagar's Easy Peasy Xmas

Television, 1998

Jo Seagar’s Easy Peasy Xmas saw chef and author Jo Seagar offering advice on how to get Christmas cooking and hosting done right. In the first episode of three, Seagar plans for a Christmas drinks party, and provides advice on how to host the perfect festive get-together. Later episodes feature recipes for eggnog, Christmas pudding, and glazed ham. The following year saw one-off special Jo Seagar’s Easy Peasy Easter. Seagar made her television debut in 1998 with Real Food for Real People with Jo Seagar, shortly before her Easy Peasy shows. Jo Seagar Cooks followed in 2007.