Blood, Sweat and Touring

Television, 1990 (Full Length)

The follow up to 1989 tour doco The Good, the Bad and the Rugby sees winger John Kirwan narrate an insider’s guide to the All Blacks’ 1990 tour to France: from Michael Jones negotiating a haircut (“how do you say ‘square top’ in French?”) to 19-year-old Simon Mannix leading a ‘Ten Guitars’ singalong. Footy relics of the era include afternoon test matches, four point tries, placed kick-offs, sneaky ciggies and Steinlager. Producer Ric Salizzo later repeated the Pasta Productions’ recipe — sports fandom mixed with schoolboy pratfalls — in the successful Sports Cafe series.

The Living Earth - First Episode

Television, 1992 (Full Length Episode)

Ebullient presenter Dale Harvey brings his sunny ways to the first episode of this lifestyle series, which is aimed squarely at those with green thumbs. The episode opens with co-presenter Annie Whittle giving viewers a guided tour of her own garden (which boasts an incredible view), and sharing tips for an optimal vege patch. The rejuvenation of the old Edmonds Factory gardens is celebrated after the building's demolition in 1991, and Harvey trades gardening tips with lifelong gardener and radio personality, Ernie Rogers. All Black Michael Jones pops by for a quirky cameo.

The Adventure World of Sir Edmund Hillary - The Sea Pillars of Great Barrier

Television, 1977 (Full Length)

The Adventure World TV series saw Sir Ed lead an A-Team of mates on a run of adventures. The concept was dreamt up by Bob Harvey, who enlisted Roger Donaldson to direct The Kaipo Wall and an (unproduced) Everest trip. Sir Ed and his climbing mate Mike Gill then went DIY and made two half hour films. This mission to climb The Needles — a rock stack off Great Barrier Island — was the first. Peter Mulgrew sails them over, Murray Jones goes parkour on the rocks and scales a kauri, Graeme Dingle surfs a dingy, and Sir Ed is the self-described “peppery co-ordinator”.

All Blacks for Africa - A Black and White Issue

Television, 1992 (Full Length)

This 1992 TV One documentary follows the All Blacks on their first post-apartheid visit to South Africa. The footy tour tomfoolery of producer Ric Salizzo’s earlier All Blacks docos is subbed off for reflections on politics and sport from players — including ex-All Black Ken Gray, who refused to tour the republic in 1970 and joined protesters in 1981. Not all goes to script for a “new South Africa”: the Afrikaans anthem is played before the Ellis Park test, and the All Blacks win. Future South Africa cricket star Herschelle Gibbs is a young coloured player mentored by the ABs.

All Blacks Profiles - Jerry Collins

Television, 2007 (Full Length)

In this interview before the 2007 Rugby World Cup, All Black flanker Jerry Collins visits Trust Porirua Park, where he started playing rugby at the age of 11 for Norths RFC (other ex members include Hika Reid, and Christian Cullen). Collins, who was widely known as a hard-hitting and physical player, discusses how "getting smashed" was part of the game from the beginning: "I became good at it. Then I became good at doing it to other people”. He also reveals what he thinks about during the national anthem and haka. Collins and his partner Alana Madill died in a car crash in June 2015.

Close Up - All Blacks interview (June 2005)

Television, 2005 (Full Length Episode)

This Close Up All Blacks interview was broadcast from Christchurch Football Club, ahead of the opening test of the much anticipated 2005 tour by the British Lions. Mark Sainsbury is the MC, as coach Graham Henry, captain Tana Umaga, vice-captain Richie McCaw and young lock James Ryan talk pre-game rituals, mentors, half-time food and nicknames (McCaw is known as ‘Fluffy’?). Umaga would shortly make headlines for his part in a controversial tackle on Brian O’Driscoll, which ruled the Lions captain out for the rest of the series (won 3 - 0 by the All Blacks).

The Wyllie Bunch

Television, 1991 (Full Length)

The third of Pasta Productions’ popular All Blacks documentaries sees winger John Kirwan provide running commentary on the team’s path to the 1991 World Cup in England: from Argentina to Sydney and Auckland to contest the Bledisloe; from facing bottle and orange missiles in Tucumán to touch on Bondi Beach. JK muses on why coach Alex Wyllie is nicknamed ‘Grizz’, Neil and Tim Finn provide musical accompaniment (“I see black”), and Canterbury Uglies are the training uniform du jour. Meanwhile on-field signs are ominous for the reigning world champs.  

Chinks, Coconuts and Curry-munchers

Television, 2002 (Full Length)

This 2002 documentary explores contemporary Aotearoa from the perspective of Kiwis from a range of different (non-Māori, non-Pākehā) ethnic backgrounds. These citizens speak frankly about their experience of assimilation and stereotyping in a supposedly multicultural society, where ethnic food is beloved — but not ethnic difference — and where jokes and racism blur. Directed by Libby Hakaraia, the documentary screened on TV3 as part of doco slot Inside New Zealand. It was a follow up to 2000's The Truth about Māori, which looked at identity from a Māori perspective.

Pavlova Paradise Revisited - Episode Three

Television, 2002 (Full Length Episode)

Brit MP Austin Mitchell began his career as a lecturer and broadcaster in New Zealand, back in the 1960s. He went on to write about Aotearoa in classic 1972 book The Half Gallon Quarter Acre Pavlova Paradise. In this final part of his 2002 return to Godzone, Mitchell takes Auckland's pulse in a pre-Supercity era, with John Banks as mayor and the America’s Cup in the cabinet. He also examines music and sport. The series ends with musings on Kiwi identity from Helen Clark, Sam Neill, and Michael King. Look out for a young Valerie Adams roughly 4 minutes 30 seconds into clip four.

The Adventure World of Sir Edmund Hillary - The Kaipo Wall (Part One)

Television, 1974 (Full Length)

Aotearoa's place as an adventure sport mecca is vividly captured in this classic 70s documentary, directed by Roger Donaldson (Smash Palace). Sir Edmund Hillary leads an A-Team of mates to tackle Fiordland's unclimbed Kaipo Wall. In part one, they set out to kayak and raft down the Hollyford River's white water rapids for the first time (they're soon overturned, bashed and wet). At Lake McKerrow they build a DIY sailboat with a tent fly and branches (Bear Grylls take note), then tramp along windswept sands and through thick bush to reach the imposing wall.