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Spotlight

Kiwi Soaps

Curated by the NZ On Screen team . 10 Items

It is time to pull back the curtains on classic Kiwi TV soaps of yesteryear. Soap operas officially hit NZ television in 1975: two of them did actually, although Close to Home was the one that lasted (A Going Concern was the one that didn't). The other longstayers in this Spotlight collection are...

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Spotlight

Close to Home - 40 Years On

Curated by the NZ On Screen team . 5 Items

It's now been more than 40 years since pioneering soap opera Close to Home first beamed into Kiwi living rooms. For just over eight years, the life and times of Wellington’s Hearte clan screened each Monday and Tuesday night. Toast the Heartes with the first and final episodes, plus a special com...

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Spotlight

Before They Were Politicians

Curated by the NZ On Screen team . 12 Items

Dirty tricks, changing allegiances, a big public vote to see who stays ... it all sounds like a reality TV show. Alas it’s politics. Many of our representatives had practice for the soap opera of life in The House. See speculating John, smiling Lockwood, dancing Pita, charming Bob, geeky Charles,...

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Interview

Close to Home: New Zealand’s first TV soap opera…

Interviews - Andrew Whiteside, Ian Pryor; Camera – Andrew Whiteside, Leonardo Guerchmann, Alex Backhouse; Editing – Andrew Whiteside.

Close to Home first screened on TV One in May 1975 and ran for eight years. The popular and ground-breaking series was New Zealand television's first soap opera. It was based in Wellington and centred around the trials and tribulations of the Hearte family. At its peak in 1977, Close to Home attracted a twice weekly audience of one million viewers.

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Interview

Steve La Hood: Bruno, Lebanon and causing accidents on soap operas…

Interview and Editing - Ian Pryor Camera - Jess Charlton

Steve La Hood began directing on soap opera Close to Home, and went on to direct tele-play Swimming Lessons, Bruno Lawrence documentary Numero Bruno and episodes of Shark in the Park and Shortland Street. He also produced ground-breaking series The Marching Girls. These days he creates multimedia attractions around the globe with company Story Inc, alongside James McLean.

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Collection

NZ Fashion On Screen

Curated by NZ On Screen team

This collection, launched to honour 10 years of NZ Fashion Week, celebrates Kiwi fashion on screen. From TV showpieces (B&H, Corbans) to docos on designers; Gloss to archive gold, from Swannies to Split Enz, taniko to foot fetish ... take a stroll down the catwalk of our sartorial screen past. Beauties include ex-Miss Universe Lorraine Downes and a teenage Rachel Hunter.

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A Going Concern (short clip)

Television, 1975 (Excerpts)

A forgotten slice of New Zealand TV history, A Going Concern was the country's second, short-lived soap opera. Launched in July 1975 — two months after rival soap Close to Home — it revolved around the staff of a South Auckland plastics factory. The characters were a mixture of Pākehā and Māori, plus a Brit (entertainer Ray Woolf, in his first acting role). Apart from this 23 second clip pulled from a 1975 variety show, the series is believed destroyed. A Going Concern won solid reviews, but the new channel's limited coverage affected audience numbers; it ended after a year.  

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Shortland Street - First Episode

Television, 1992 (Full Length Episode)

The first episode of Shortland Street starts with a pregnant woman being rushed to the clinic after an accident. Only the doctors are all missing. Visiting Doctor Hone Ropata (Temuera Morrison), who is soon to join the Shortland Street team, makes the call to deliver the baby. Head nurse Carrie Burton (Lisa Crittenden) disagrees, and proceeds to mention that Doctor Ropata is no longer in Guatemala. This first episode of the five night a week soap screened on 25 May 1992. It would go on to become New Zealand's longest running TV drama (but not our first soap — that was Close to Home).

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Close to Home - Final Episode

Television, 1983 (Full Length Episode)

This is the final episode of the pioneering Kiwi soap. TV One’s Hearte family saga achieved enormous popularity during its eight year run, and provided a training ground for a generation of screen talent. But by 1982 Close to Home’s characters were aging, and the show faced competition from US youth-focused fare (eg. Fame, The Six Million Dollar Man). With this 818th episode it was time for moving house, nostalgic re-caps, for The Seekers’ ‘Carnival is Over’ to score the opening credits, and for Tom (John Bach) to stub out his last ciggie and write the ending.

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Close to Home - First Episode

Television, 1975 (Full Length Episode)

Pioneering soap opera Close To Home first screened in May 1975. For just over eight years (until August 1983) middle New Zealand found their mirror in the life and times of Wellington’s Hearte clan. At its peak in 1977 nearly one million viewers tuned in twice weekly to watch the series co-created by Michael Noonan and Tony Isaac. This first episode sees the family gathering for Grandfather’s 78th birthday. Vivian (Ilona Rodgers) moans to Tom (John Bach): “you’ve drunk all my cooking sherry”, then tenderises the beef with the empty bottle.