Collection

The Car Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

NZ On Screen's Car Collection is loaded with vehicles of every make and vintage, as a line-up of legendary Kiwis get behind the wheel — some acting the part. The talent includes Bruce McLaren, Scott Dixon, Bruno Lawrence, a clever canine, and a great many bent fenders. Onetime car show host Danny Mulheron tells tales, and picks out some personal favourites here. 

Collection

Nuclear-free New Zealand

Curated by NZ On Screen team

On 8 June 1987 Nuclear-free New Zealand became law. This collection honours the principles and people behind the policy. Prime Minister Norman Kirk put it like this: "I don't think New Zealand's a doormat. I think we've got rights — we're a small country but we've got equal rights, and we're going to assert them." In the backgrounder, journalist Tim Watkin explores the twists and turns of Aotearoa's nuclear history.   

Collection

The Bruno Lawrence Collection

Curated by NZ On Screen team

Actor Bruno Lawrence rounds out a handful (Buck, Billy T, The Topps, Crumpy) of Kiwi icons who have achieved sufficient mana to be recognised by an abbreviated name. His charisma was key to ground-breaking films, Smash Palace, The Quiet Earth and Utu. Jack Nicholson reputedly had Bruno envy. This collection celebrates his inimitable performances and life.

Extraordinary Kiwis - Zoe Bell

Television, 2007 (Full Length Episode)

This 2007 episode of Extraordinary Kiwis follows personable stuntwoman Zoë Bell as her career leaps into the stuff of fantasy: a big acting role in Quentin Tarantino's Death Proof, playing herself while balanced on top of a speeding car. Home movies reveal a childhood spent on the family trampoline, and training for gymnastics. Later Bell learnt about fighting and wire work while doubling for Lucy Lawless on Xena: Warrior Princess. A ligament injury on Kill Bill left her sidelined for three months, but Death Proof would open doors to further acting roles, including Tarantino's The Hateful Eight.   

Pūkana - 2015 Episode

Television, 2015 (Full Length Episode)

Named after the exaggerated facial expressions performed in a haka, this long-running children's series emphasises the energy of contemporary youth culture. Made by company Cinco Cine, Pūkana was pioneering in Māori language programming for kids. This 2015 episode sees the crew of reporters stunt driving, skydiving, camping, kayaking, bungy jumping, and hanging out with a tarantula. The crew includes past Homai te Pakipaki champ Pikiteora Mura-Hitai, and veteran Pūkana presenter Tiara Tāwera, who is about to follow Mātai Smith and switch to directing on the show.

Spot On - Final Episode

Television, 1988 (Full Length Episode)

Beloved by 70s and 80s era Kiwi kids, Spot On mixed educational items and entertainment. For the final episode, broadcast live on Christmas Day 1988, guest host Bob Parker celebrates the show’s 15 years by tracking down almost every Spot On presenter. There are also clips of fondly remembered sketches and adventures, set to pop hits of the day. The roll call of presenters includes Phil Keoghan, Ian Taylor, Danny Watson, Erin Dunleavy, Ole Maiava, Helen McGowan and the late Marcus Turner. Spot On won Best Children’s Programme at the 1988 Listener Film and TV awards.

Shaker Run

Film, 1985 (Excerpts)

Stunt driver Judd (US Oscar winner Cliff Robertson) and his mechanic Casey (ex child star Leif Garrett) are in NZ racing 'Shaker' — their pink and black Trans-Am — when they're enlisted by scientist Dr Christine Ruben on a fast and furious dash from Dunedin. Unknown to the Yanks, Ruben (Lisa Harrow) has stolen a deadly virus that she's aiming to smuggle to the CIA, and away from the NZ military — who plan to use it for bio warfare! Touted as "fantasy car violence", the chase and stunt-laden Run was one of dozens of films sped out under an 80s tax break scheme.

Series

Back of the Y Masterpiece Television

Television, 2001–2008

This cult late-night TV2 series was a bawdy bogan Kiwi variety show, mixing sacrilege, beer-fuelled hijinks and Jackass-like stunts. Created by Chris Stapp and Matt Heath, it centred around a mock live TV show, with music from house band Deja Voodoo. Characters such as "retarded South Island mechanic" Spanners Watson featured in BSA-baiting segments like 'Randy Campbell's Extreme Stunts' (fodder for film The Devil Dared Me To) and 'Cunstables'. This first series also screened on MTV2 in Europe and Channel V in Australia. A second series screened on C4 in 2008.

Back of the Y Masterpiece Television - 4, Series One, Episode Four

Television, 2001 (Full Length Episode)

This episode of Chris Stapp and Matt Heath's bawdy, bogan, BSA baiting TV variety series spoof promises "action packed action". The Constables need the assistance of the Onehunga Armed Offenders Squad to nullify the threat posed by a small boy with a water pistol. Host Danny Parker interviews "retarded South Island mechanic" Spanners Watson about the increase in mechanical incompetence and hospitalisations since he joined stuntman Randy Campbell's crew. Campbell's stunt will only ever end one way, and "NZ's number one porn detective" Smoodiver debuts.

The Motor Show - Minis

Television, 1981 (Excerpts)

One of the most influential cars of the 20th century, the compact Mini attained Kiwi icon status in 1981 after it starred in movie Goodbye Pork Pie. In these clips from the 1980s Kiwi automobile series, reporter Islay McLeod (then Islay Benge) interviews Pork Pie stunt driver Peter Zivkovic about his "fun" experience; motor racing legend Chris Amon takes a Mini for a spin around Manawatu's Manfield race track; and ex newsreader  Dougal Stevenson talks to a mechanic about the pitfalls of the Mini, including a tendency to rust and slip out of gear.