Waiting

Rhian Sheehan, Music Video, 2001

With a total budget of $150 and some favours, this miniature space odyssey — winner of the Viewer's Choice award at 2002's Handle the Jandal contest— packs a supernova sized punch. With slick miniature work (skills honed on the sets of The Lord of the Rings and King Kong), director Olly Coleman achieves a tranquili mood that is in perfect harmony with the track. The Rhian Sheehan track features vocals by Lotus Hartley. 

Buddy

Snapper, Music Video, 1988

‘Buddy’ is a mean and distorted classic, and director Stuart Page’s video matches the menacing mood with imagery that includes bad-arse motorbikes, underwater sea creatures, and skulls. Grainy, grungy, great.

Calliope!

The Veils, Music Video, 2006

This performance clip for The Veils is given a distinctive edge using various effects that add a moody, jittery vibe. The overlaid animations — moths trace arcs in the air, shadows move in the background, and the moon and stars make an appearance  — add a mood of underworld ethereality, and an echo of the silent movie era. The clip was made by the Brownlee brothers (not the English triathletes). It was nominated for video of the year in the 2007 Juice TV awards. The song is taken from second Veils album Nux Vomica.

Cool World

Grace, Music Video, 1995

The video for 'Cool World' melds a mood of paranoia — including flashes of recording equipment, and worried words about surveillance — with numerous images of a model in a silver halter top, dealing to a punching bag. The Samoan brothers Ioasa create a smoothly percussive sound, which echoes overseas bands like Roxy Music and The Blue Nile much more strongly than other music coming out of Aotearoa in this period (1995). The song is taken from Grace's only album Black Sand Shore, which writer Nick Bollinger later rated as one of New Zealand's 100 finest. 

Royals

Lorde, Music Video, 2013

'Royals' took Lorde far indeed. The Auckland teen found herself topping the charts in ten countries, with her debut single (which she co-wrote with producer Joel Little). The award-winning music video has been seen a mind-boggling 680 million+ times online. The clip was born from conversations between Lorde and director Joel Kefali about what it was like to be a teen in Auckland. Kefali has said the intent was to "capture a mood, capture a particular (sometimes ignored) slice of teenage life". The American version of the video features slightly more of Lorde than the original.

Donka

Headless Chickens, Music Video, 1988–1988

With its skittering drum loops and unsteady vocals punctuated with bursts of industrial-strength noise, Donka is an early example of Headless Chickens’ ever-evolving sound. Director Stuart Page (working with the Chickens' Grant Fell) cuts together a wild collage to echo the song’s mood swings. Chris Matthews' deadpan delivery to camera — occasionally in butoh-type face paint — provides a spot of calm amongst the blizzard of grotesque close-ups, absurd costumes, time-lapse and triple exposures. Fell wrote later that the video cost $527.55 to make.

Afternoon in Bed

The Bats , Music Video, 1995

The Bats in a suitably enigmatic mood in a video directed by John Chrisstoffels that is as mysterious as the song itself. What was said that is causing the protagonist so much reflection is never really clear - and neither is the reason why the unidentifiable figure with the spade is burying cutlery and a barometer on a hillside high on Godley Head overlooking Pegasus Bay. Elsewhere the band perform at King Edward Barracks (now a parking lot in central Christchurch) and in their practice room, as well as with some of their favourite toys.    [This video is made available by The Film Archive]