Murray Newey

Producer

Murray Newey produced New Zealand's first horror film - Death Warmed Up, and went on to win international investment in four Kiwi-made features: Moonrise, Never Say Die, teen tale Bonjour Timothy and award-winner The Whole of the Moon.

Murray Reece

Director

Murray Reece has been the director at a number of key turning points in New Zealand's television history: from the debut of our first drama series (Pukemanu), to the first telemovie (The God Boy), to the episode of Country Calendar where Fred Dagg first showed us around the farm.

Murray Keane

Director, Actor

Actor/director Murray Keane played a 60s teen in TV's Peppermint Twist, multiple roles in sketch show Away Laughing, a soldier in Chunuk Bair, and a zombie victim in Braindead. In the 90s he moved into directing, with short films and episodes of Shortland Street. Keane has since helmed multiple episodes of Outrageous Fortune and The Almighty Johnsons, and co-created cross-cultural car drama Ride with the Devil. He was nominated at the 2006 NZ Screen Awards for police show Interrogation

Murray McNabb

Composer

Composer and keyboardist Murray McNabb — who died 9 June 2013 — stood “at the forefront of NZ jazz” (Amplifier.co.nz) for over four decades. In the 90s McNabb paired with Murray Grindlay to compose for the screen, and work on many commercials. The results included the iconic soundtrack for Once Were Warriors, the moody Broken English score, TV bodice-ripper Greenstone, and an unreleased soundtrack for What Becomes of the Broken Hearted?

Murray Wood

Musical Director, Television Executive

The consummate all-rounder, Murray Wood began arranging and performing music for television in the 1970s. Later he founded computer sales company MagnumMac, and spent seven years as managing director of Canterbury Television. Wood died in the collapse of the CTV building, in the earthquake of February 22 2011.

Murray Grindlay

Composer, Singer

Since first winning fame as lead singer of 60s blues band The Underdogs, Murray Grindlay has gone on to apply his musical talents as a composer for feature films (Sleeping Dogs, Once Were Warriors), veteran jingle-writer (including the classic Crunchie train robbery commercial), and producer (hit single 'Sailing Away', Goldenhorse's Out of the Moon). 

Murray Milne

Cinematographer

Cameraman Murray Milne often finds himself working on jobs that involve swimming or hanging from helicopters. After starting on commercials, Milne worked with director Richard Riddiford, filming 80s road movie romance Arriving Tuesday, and Zilch! Following acclaimed shorts with Costa Botes, Milne did impressive work for Peter Jackson on Meet the Feebles and zombie epic Braindead. Since then Milne's work has mixed TV with aerial and underwater photography. 

Barry Barclay

Director, Writer [Ngāti Apa]

Barry Barclay — director of landmark TV series Tangata Whenua and feature film Ngati  was a longtime campaigner for the right of indigenous people to tell their own stories, to their own people. In 2004 he was made an Arts Foundation Laureate, and in 2007 a Member of the NZ Order of Merit. Barclay passed away on 19 February 2008, after publishing his acclaimed book Mana Tuturu.

Simon Reece

Editor

Simon Reece has had a long career editing television and film, cutting landmarks such as Tank Busters, The Governor, Pukemanu, The God Boy and Vigil. In 1990 he shifted post-production roles and set up Wellington company The Dub Shop, which specializes in providing digital services for broadcast, web and archives.

Rudall Hayward

Film Pioneer

Legendary filmmaker Rudall Hayward, MBE, directed seven features over five decades — decades in which the concept of Kiwi movie-making was still an oxymoron, or meant a foreigner was in charge. Inspired by NZ’s cross-cultural history, Hayward remade his own Rewi’s Last Stand in 1940. Later he married Rewi star Ramai Te Miha, launching a filmmaking partnership that lasted until Rudall’s death in May 1974.