Geoff Bryan

Presenter

After starting in television as a continuity announcer in the early 80s, Geoff Bryan moved into sports presenting. Since then the veteran sportscaster has presented coverage of tennis, cricket, World Cup rugby, the Commonwealth Games and for every Olympics since Atlanta 1996.

Phillip Leishman

Presenter

The name Phillip Leishman is synonymous with sports broadcasting in New Zealand. Over a four decade career he presented sports news and major events from the Olympics to rugby tests, plus a globally-syndicated golf show. He also branched out into popular quiz shows and entertainment specials (notably Wheel of Fortune). Leishman died on 25 February 2013, after a battle with cancer. He was 61. 

Peter Montgomery

Commentator

Peter Montgomery’s colourful and vibrant commentaries made him “the voice of New Zealand yachting”. Through the 1980s and 1990s, Montgomery played a major part in the sport’s move to mass popularity and had a central role in radio and TV coverage of Team New Zealand’s America’s Cup campaigns. On dry land, he has covered many other sports, and made the Eden Park side-line his own over two decades of rugby commentaries. 

April Ieremia

Presenter

Samoan-born but raised in Christchurch, April Ieremia joined netball's Silver Ferns at age 21. Later she captained the Kiwi team against Wales. After co-presenting Moro Sports Extra in 1993, she began hosting the sports section of TVNZ's primetime news. Ieremia helped cover the Olympic Games, and commentated netball and tennis. Her show April’s Angels screened in 1997. Since then Ieremia has presented lifestyle show April in the Afternoon for Sky TV's Living channel, and Choice TV's weekday magazine show Brunch, with Josh Kronfeld. In 2007 she competed on Dancing with the Stars

Andrew Hawthorn

Producer, Director

After starting his career as an actor then doing eight years in the editing suite, Andrew Hawthorn has made his biggest mark in sports coverage. A child star in kidult drama Hunter's Gold, Hawthorn did time as a radio DJ and TV editor before moving into sports for TVNZ. After helming Olympics coverage and groundbreaking America's Cup coverage that was seen around the world, he joined Sky Sports in 2010.

Julie Christie

Producer

Julie Christie, DNZM, is one of New Zealand's most successful television producers. She built her company, Touchdown Productions, into the country's leading producer of entertainment television and exporter of programme formats. In 2006 she sold Touchdown to global company Eyeworks in a multi-million dollar deal; she stayed on as managing director until 2012.

Jackie van Beek

Actor, Director, Writer

The multi-talented Jackie van Beek emerged from Wellington’s theatre scene in the 1990s. After directing a run of award-winning shorts, her first feature The Inland Road was invited to the 2017 Berlin Film Festival. She went on to co-direct, co-write and co-star in comedy The Breaker Upperers, with Madeleine Sami. As an actor, van Beek is probably best known for playing a vampire groupie on What We Do in the Shadows

Ian Taylor

Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāpuhi

Former Spot On presenter Ian Taylor, CNZM, is the founder of computer graphics company Animation Research Limited. ARL made its name providing real-time sports graphics at the 1992 America's Cup, and has gone on to apply their technology to golf, cricket, tennis and Formula One car-racing around the globe.

Alan Morris

Producer, Executive

In a career spanning four decades, Alan Morris worked in radio and television in NZ, Australia, England and Europe. He turned his hand to announcing, copywriting, presenting and training, but at heart felt he was a producer and director. Morris was Director-General of TV One during the early days of two channel TV in NZ in the late 70s, and also held senior positions at the ABC and Associated-Rediffusion in the UK. 

Peter Hudson

Presenter

Peter Hudson was the dark-haired half of Hudson and Halls, whose cookery show won high ratings and a 1981 public vote for entertainer of the year. Hudson and partner David Halls' shows were marked by comic banter, and the occasional oven fire. Later they relocated to London, to make programmes for the BBC.