TV3 Begins - First Transmission

Television, 1989 (Excerpts)

TV3 celebrated its launch with a two-hour special featuring music, montages, and a Māori welcome. Aotearoa's first new television channel in more than two decades went to air on 26 November 1989, after years of meetings, hard graft and competing bidders. This clip of TV3's first ten minutes creates a party atmosphere of smiling happy faces. Dave Dobbyn and dancers get energetic in promotional song 'Get the Feeling', then Governor-General Sir Paul Reeves pulls the launch lever. Also featured are appearances by a wide array of Kiwis, from children to soldiers to Sam Hunt.

Newshub - Hilary Barry's last TV3 bulletin (excerpt, 27 May 2016)

Television, 2016 (Excerpts)

Hilary Barry was in her early 20s when she began reporting for TV3 in 1993. Twenty-three years later she left the network, after more than a decade co-presenting its prime time bulletin. In this excerpt from her last TV3 bulletin, newsreader Mike McRoberts gives an emotional farewell speech. A best of Barry video package shows her drinking a Spam smoothie for an early story, laughing about an "emergency defecation situation", and reporting from Christchurch and South Africa. Barry later spoke of leaving TV3 after many close colleagues had left the network.

The Paul Henry Show - John Key interview

Television, 2014 (Excerpts)

This interview with Prime Minister John Key is taken from the January 2014 debut episode of Paul Henry’s late night TV3 show. Displaying the informal style that marked his tenure, Key banters with Henry about playing golf in Hawaii with US President Barack Obama, and responds to the hard questions, eg whether it would have been better in hindsight for John’s son Max to have not beaten the President. It’s election year and the pair discuss coalition options: the Māori Party, Peter Dunne and Winston Peters. Henry pulls out four photos, and asks which of them can be trusted.

The X Factor (NZ) - 2013 Grand Final

Television, 2013 (Full Length)

The first New Zealand final of The X Factor features emotional highs and lows, and judge's compliments aplenty. Three young singers made it through in 2013: Whenua Patuwai, Jackie Thomas and Benny Tipene. All would achieve NZ top three singles within weeks of the final. Among the highlights of the 95 minute special: Tipene's acoustic version of 'Hey Ya!', Patuwai's 'A Change is Gonna Come' and Thomas's emotional last number — not to mention the showstopping opening: Daft Punk's 'Get Lucky', featuring 13 finalists, an acrobat, and two dancers wearing mirrorball heads. 

All Blacks Profiles - Jerry Collins

Television, 2007 (Full Length)

In this interview before the 2007 Rugby World Cup, All Black flanker Jerry Collins visits Trust Porirua Park, where he started playing rugby at the age of 11 for Norths RFC (other ex members include Hika Reid, and Christian Cullen). Collins, who was widely known as a hard-hitting and physical player, discusses how "getting smashed" was part of the game from the beginning: "I became good at it. Then I became good at doing it to other people”. He also reveals what he thinks about during the national anthem and haka. Collins and his partner Alana Madill died in a car crash in June 2015.

Paul Henry - John Key's '9-in-10' challenge

Television, 2015 (Excerpts)

Former Prime Minister John Key made regular appearances in the media, and was game for taking on more than political questions: from reading out the top ten list on America's Late Show with David Letterman, to participating in pranks on The Rock radio station. In July 2015 Key faced up to the '9-in-10' challenge on Paul Henry’s MediaWorks breakfast show — trying to provide nine correct answers to a general knowledge question, in ten seconds. The subject for the ex-stock market trader? International currencies. The prize was a Jeep Cherokee for Ronald McDonald House.

Campbell Live - Driving Dogs

Television, 2012 (Excerpts)

In late 2012 Campbell Live showed that dogs could be taught new tricks, when canines Monty and Porter got behind the wheel of a Mini Countryman and took it for a racetrack spin. On 10 December in a "world first" live test drive, Monty went solo and Porter (nearly) drove reporter Tristram Clayton around a bend. The following night saw definitive evidence that dogs can turn corners. The stunt was an SPCA campaign to change perception about the intelligence of rescued canines. Animal wrangler Mark Vette trained the driving dogs, who attracted global media attention.

3 News - Internet Mana Launch

Television, 2014 (Excerpts)

This extraordinary moment in New Zealand political history occurred during the 2014 election campaign. Kim Dotcom, a colourful German-born file-sharing mogul exiled in NZ, had helped form a political party — Internet Mana — to “disrupt” the campaign. The party’s 24 August launch went awry when Dotcom fled from reporters keen to follow up a remark made during his speech (he hinted he could hack Prime Minister John Key’s credit rating). Internet Mana press secretary Pam Corkery infamously berated reporters, calling TV3's Brook Sabin a “puffed up little s**t.”

All Blacks Profiles - Mils Muliaina

Television, 2007 (Full Length)

This pre-Rugby World Cup 2007 interview follows All Black fullback Mils Muliaina as he revisits the grounds of his alma mater, Southland Boys High in Invercargill (Mils is one of 21 All Blacks from Southland Boys). He talks about his family’s migration from Samoa to Invercargill, and heads south to Bluff to score some oysters with the film crew. Muliaina also talks about finding out via the six o’clock news that he was in the All Blacks, recalls the game he remembers most fondly, and discusses his fondness for rolling his rrrs.

All Blacks Profiles - Anton Oliver

Television, 2007 (Full Length)

This 2007 pre-World Cup profile interviews All Black hooker Anton Oliver. Oliver chats candidly from his home above a Dunedin art gallery about his long tenure in the black jersey: the 1999 RWC “mugging” by France, captaincy, and his desire not to be seen as a “rugby head”. Oliver — much-respected as a master of the dark arts of scrummaging — also had a reputation as the thinking man’s All Black, an image reinforced when he left rugby the year after this interview to study for an Msc at Oxford University in “bio-domestic conservation management”!