Asia Downunder - Chinese New Year, Year of the Tiger

Television, 2010 (Excerpts)

2010 was the Year of the Tiger and on the eve of the Chinese New Year, Asia Downunder roving reporter Bharat Jamnadas shows the strength of the Auckland Chinese community by visiting festivities held at two extremely well-attended events on the same day: ASB Showgrounds in Auckland and the TelstraClear Pacific Events Centre in Manukau. There are interviews with Chinese community leaders who discuss the long history of Chinese New Year celebrations in Auckland, and footage of event highlights, including the world famous Hunan acrobat troupe.

Open Door - Chinese New Zealand

Television, 2006 (Full Length)

This episode of the Open Door series focuses on Chinese New Zealanders of different backgrounds coming to terms with their multiple identities, while living in New Zealand. The documentary explores how their Chinese ethnic origin and the conflicting attitudes of parents and peer groups can cause problems. The people interviewed have embraced the positive aspects of two different cultures; they share their personal experiences and opinions on the best way forward for New Zealand as an increasingly multi-cultural nation.

Asia Downunder - Chinese New Year, Year of the Ox Lantern Festival

Television, 2009 (Full Length Episode)

This episode of Asia Downunder takes a look at the Chinese New Year. In the first segment, ‘Year of the Ox’, host Ling Ling Liang looks at how people born in this year are said to be strong and determined. She also examines traditional illustrations of oxen, and talks to the designers behind the NZ Post stamp series for the Year of the Ox. In the Lanterns for Sale segment, roving reporter Bharat Jamnadas visits the 10th annual Lantern Festival in Auckland's Albert Park, and talks to Barry Wah Lee, from longtime Asian goods emporium Wah Lees.

Rooster Rooster Dragon Rat - Oscar's Guide to the Chinese Zodiac

Television, 2013 (Excerpts)

Comedian (and rooster) Oscar Kightley fronts this 2013 beginner’s guide to the Chinese zodiac. His mission: to explore the 12 oriental star signs. As the Kiwi population heads towards one in six being of Asian origin, Kightley surveys a cavalcade of contemporary Kiwi personalities for their views on stargazing, from his Harry co-star Sam Neill to lawyer Mai Chen. This excerpt is a potted history of the oriental zodiac, aided by animation; then it's enter the dragon. Made for TV3’s Inside New Zealand documentary strand it was directed by bro’Town creator Elizabeth Mitchell.

Chinese Whispers

Short Film, 1996 (Full Length)

This short film follows Vincent (Leighton Phair), a young Chinese-Kiwi rescued from a group of racist punks in a spacies parlour by a mysterious Asian (Gary Young), then drawn into a seedy Triad underworld. Vincent is struggling with his identity in a mixed race family. Directors Stuart McKenzie and Neil Pardington wrote the story with playwright Lynda Chanwai-Earle, drawing it from interviews with members of the Chinese community in Wellington and Christchurch. Early 90s Flying Nun bands feature on the score; DJ Mu (future Fat Freddys Drop frontman) cameos as a punk.

The Māori Sidesteps - Series One

Web, 2016 (Full Length Episodes)

Tired of working his go nowhere job at Pete’s Emporium in Porirua, Jamie (Jamie McCaskill) persuades some of his workmates (Cohen Holloway, Rob Mokaraka and Jerome Leota) to form band The Māori Sidesteps. Throughout this web series they find themselves at inopportune gigs, deal with interference from their over-reaching manager Dollar$ (Raybon Kan), and face an early band break up. Luckily the band is reinforced by Jamie’s brother Kelly (Erroll Anderson), who joins as a fifth member — outshining several other auditionees (including Jemaine Clement). 

Intrepid Journeys - China (Katie Wolfe)

Television, 2004 (Full Length Episode)

In this full-length Intrepid Journey actor/director Katie Wolfe takes her "appalling sense of direction" to China, a country caught between old ways and new. Wolfe travels by plane, boat, cyclo and train, which she calls "the perfect way to travel". She does three days in the Blade Runner-like cityscapes of Shanghai, where she meets an 86-year-old dancer, and visits the Forbidden City of Beijing. Wolfe also heads up the Yangtze River, visiting ghostly cities and apartment blocks, drained of people by major dam construction — before stumbling upon a most effective way to haggle.

An Immigrant Nation - The Footprints of the Dragon

Television, 1994 (Full Length)

Footprints of the Dragon examines immigration from China and Taiwan, through interviews with three families: the Kwoks, already into their fifth generation down under; and two families from Taiwan, who are far more recent arrivals. One woman is forced to return frequently to Taiwan, to earn money for the family. The documentary also examines discrimination against early Chinese migrants in the late 1800s, who were required to pay a 100 pound poll tax. The episode is directed by Listener film critic Helene Wong, herself a third-generation Chinese-New Zealander. 

Loading Docs 2017 - East Meets East

Web, 2017 (Full Length)

Director Julie Zhu's love letter to a Chinese East Auckland community follows her grandmother as she carries out what may seem a mundane task — grocery shopping. But to Fang Ruzhen, her daily ritual of buying food is what connects her to several other aged Chinese grandparents, who hop on buses in large groups to head to the supermarket. Ruzhen moved to New Zealand nearly 20 years ago to help look after her grandson. Now she is 79 and can barely speak any English.  "Going shopping every day…well, that’s our strength. Without this, what would we do?" 

The Red House

Film, 2012 (Trailer)

Director Alyx Duncan set out to make an experimental documentary about her childhood home. What eventually resulted was this acclaimed and award-winning "fictional essay", her first full length feature. Blurring the line between documentary and drama, she cast her conservationist father and Chinese born step-mother as characters partially based on themselves. As they journey from a small NZ island to a big Chinese city, Duncan examines their cross cultural relationship and explores nostalgia, childhood, dreams, environmentalism, globalisation and the meaning of home.