Tom Scott

Writer, Director

Catapulted to fame after tousles with Prime Minister Robert Muldoon, Tom Scott originally trained to be a vet. He ended up helping Murray Ball turn Footrot Flats into a hit movie. The celebrated humourist and cartoonist has also told the story of Kiwi legends Edmund Hillary and David Lange, in both TV documentaries and dramas. Scott also co-wrote Rage, a TV movie about the 1981 Springbok tour.

Mike Minogue

Actor

Mike Minogue has played a lot of policemen. Although his screen debut in 2009 movie Separation City saw him cast as a fireman, he's played cops in TV movies How To Murder Your WifeDoubt: The Scott Watson Case, and Rage — which saw him getting nominated for Best Supporting Actor at the 2012 NZ TV Awards. After a small role as a gormless police officer in hit vampire comedy What We Do In The Shadows, Minogue got to reprise the role when he co-starred in spin-off series Wellington Paranormal. He is also the creator of The Watercooler, an anthology web series reenacting real life stories sent in by viewers.

Angela Littlejohn

Producer

Angela Littlejohn was a producer on Kiwi features Show of Hands, Separation City and Apron Strings. Prior to that she spent 15 years in London — including six in production and finance for Channel Four, where she worked on Trainspotting. After returning downunder, Littlejohn was producer on a run of short films, including Cannes Film Festival invitee Fog, and her first feature, 2008's Show of Hands. In 2014 she became Head of Production at Wellington company Pūkeko Pictures, where she has been on the producing team for the relaunch of TV classic Thunderbirds, and Australian-set dystopia Cleverman.

Paul Middleditch

Director

While still at school, Paul Middleditch was a repeat winner in an annual filmmaking competition run by childrens show Spot On. As a teenager he made music videos for artists Tex Pistol (including chart topper 'The Game of Love') and Tim Finn. Middleditch is now a highly successful commercials director based in Australia, where his work includes the celebrated Big Ad for Carlton Draught. In 2008 he returned to Wellington to direct his third feature, Tom Scott-scripted relationship drama Separation City.

Mike Horton

Editor

Michael Horton's CV reads like a potted history of the Kiwi film renaissance. His editing work includes classic films Goodbye Pork PieSmash Palace, Utu and Once Were Warriors. In 2003 Horton's talents won international recognition, when he was Oscar-nominated for his editing on Tolkien epic The Two Towers.

Danielle Cormack

Actor

Danielle Cormack has showcased her naturalistic, seemingly effortless acting style on both sides of the Tasman. After roles in TV soaps Gloss and Shortland Street, she began a run of big screen starring roles — Topless Women Talk About Their Lives, The Price of Milk and Via Satellite (playing twins). On Australian TV, Cormack has starred as a prisoner (Wentworth), crime lord (Underbelly: Razor) and barrister (Rake).

Allison Webber

Journalist, Director

Alongside her experience as a journalism tutor and media advisor, Allison Webber has worked on many television documentaries investigating social issues — including as driving force behind then controversial series Expressions of Sexuality.

Peter Rowley

Actor

Peter Rowley has performed alongside many Kiwi comedy legends, including David McPhail, Jon Gadsby and Billy T James. After debuting on hit 1970s sketch show A Week of It, he joined the ensembles of McPhail and Gadsby and (in 1985) The Billy T James Show. In 1994 Rowley won equal billing alongside comedian Pio Terei on Pete and Pio, before going on to co-star in McPhail and Gadsby's Letter to Blanchy.

Paul Henry

Presenter

Paul Henry has run his own radio station, and reported from Bosnia and Iraq. After presenting episodes of TV staples This is Your Life and Close Up, he won both fans and regular controversy during seven straight-talking years co-hosting live show Breakfast. After joining company MediaWorks he began hosting the three-hour long Paul Henry in April 2015. The morning show plays simultaneously on TV3, radio and online.

Steve Locker-Lampson

Camera

After stints in the merchant navy and the British film industry, Steve Locker-Lampson began a new life in New Zealand in the 60s, heading the camera department at indie production house Pacific Films. The following decade he forged a reputation as one of the country's pioneer aerial cameramen, and worked behind the scenes on movies Solo and Smash Palace. Locker-Lampson passed away in October 2012.