Christchurch-born Stacey Daniels Morrison landed her first television role with What Now? while at high school and was an original presenter of long-running youth show Mai Time. Daniels has worked in front of and behind the camera on a range of shows over the past 15 years – from Sportscafe producer to hosting resurrected Kiwi classic It’s in the Bag. Her radio credits include Mai FM 88.6, Flava and The Hits.

I believe New Zealand television is at its best when our cultural reality comes through – Kiwi culture, Māori culture and our developing modern culture. Let us not underestimate the inherent charm of our country and our people. Stacey Daniels Morrison

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Whānau Living

2014, Presenter

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It's in the Bag - Ohakune (Series Five, Episode Three)

2013, Presenter - Television

In this Māori Television reboot of the classic game show, presenters Pio Terei and Stacey Daniels Morrison take the roadshow to the North Island town of Ohakune, under the foot of Mt Ruapehu. To be able to barter for te moni or te kete, contestants have to successfully answer locally themed questions. In this episode from the fifth season, players — including one who saw Selwyn Toogood in the original show as a six-year old — are quizzed on giant carrots, halitosis, stamps and ski fields. Imagine those famous carrots in the MultiKai cooker!

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It's in the Bag - Masterton (Series Five, Episode 12)

2013, Presenter - Television

In 2009 Māori Television rebooted the classic game show first hosted by Selwyn Toogood. In this fifth season episode, Stacey Daniels Morrison and Pio Terei take the popular roadshow to Masterton in the Wairarapa. Contestants answer locally themed questions (ranging from local iwi to Brian Lochore, Jemaine Clement and Ladyhawke) and earn the right to barter for the money or the bag. But as Morrison says, “remember that lurking in some of those bags are the boobies …”. Prizes include a basketball stands, a 50 inch TV and of course, the MultiKai cooker. 

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Not Given Lightly

2012, Subject - Music video

After being diagnosed with breast cancer, TV presenter Helena McAlpine enlisted a chorus of NZ's most recognisable music voices to cover Chris Knox’s classic love song. McAlpine was determined that mothers, daughters, wives and friends get the message that the “best form of defence against breast cancer is to catch it early”. Directed by Toa Fraser, the video for the NZ Breast Cancer Foundation awareness campaign shows a run of well-known Kiwis holding pictures of women they love, in front of a backdrop of Derek Henderson photos. McAlpine died on 23 September 2015.

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It's in the Bag - Opunake (Series Four, Episode Six)

2012, Presenter - Television

In 2009 Māori Television rebooted the classic television game show first hosted by Selwyn Toogood back in 1973. Presenters Pio Terei and Stacey Daniels Morrison travelled to the regions to quiz contestants with locally-specific questions, and the players earn the right to choose between the money or the bag. In this episode from Māori TV's fourth season, the show travels to the Taranaki town of Opunake, birthplace of Peter Snell. Prizes include a multi-kai cooker and an electric guitar. The series is presented in English and te reo: “What’ll it be Aotearoa?”

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It's in the Bag - Waimamaku (Series Four, Episode Four)

2012, Presenter - Television

In 2009 Māori Television rebooted the Selwyn Toogood-hosted 70s game show, with presenters Pio Terei and Stacey Daniels Morrison giving contestants the immortal choice: the money or the bag? In this episode — complete with web players — the road show comes to Ngāpuhi territory: the Northland town of Waimamaku. The series is bilingual; but how ever you say it be careful what you choose: as Stacey says, “Instead of a TV you might get a can of V!” The show ends with Pio leading a ‘Pokarekare Ana’ singalong. “Too much!”

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What Now? - 30th Birthday Show

2011, Guest - Television

NZ telly's longest running children's show turns 30 with a two hour, live extravaganza — far removed from its modest beginnings as a half hour pre-record in 1981. Current hosts Charlie, Johnson and Gem are joined by a parade of past presenters who reminisce, and compete to find the show's best decade. Masterchef finalist Jax Hamilton provides snacks, celebrities send greetings; and — in amongst the cupcakes, gunge, fart jokes and mayhem — the programme enters its fourth decade as an institution, watched by the children of its original audience.

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No Sweat Parenting

2009, Presenter

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Kotahi Te Rā: Waitangi 2008

2008, Presenter

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Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?

2005, Presenter

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Māori Television Election Coverage: Taaria Te Wā

2005, Presenter

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New Zealand's Top 100 History-Makers

2005, Panelist

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Showstoppers (Episode)

2003, Presenter

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Test the Nation

2004, Presenter

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The Last Laugh

2002, Subject - Television

This Wayne Leonard documentary from 2002 goes on a journey to explore what defines Māori humour. The tu meke tiki tour travels from marae kitchens to TV screens, from original trickster Maui to cheeky kids, from the classic entertainers (including Prince Tui Teka tipping off an elephant) through to Billy T James, arguably the king of Māori comedy. Archive footage is complemented by interviews with well-known and everyday Kiwis, and contemporary comedians (Mike King, Pio Terei). Winston Peters and Tame Iti discuss humour as a political tool. 

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Aroha: Tiare

2001, As: Erena

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TV2 News

2001, Presenter

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Celebrity Treasure Island

2001, Subject

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I Got 2 Babe

2000, Singer - Television

This TV2 promo is a cover of Sonny and Cher classic ‘I Got You Babe’. A roll call of turn of the century Kiwi celebrities take turns performing, starting with late actor Kevin Smith and actor/sometime Strawpeople singer Stephanie Tauevihi. Other stars include Jay Laga’aia, Havoc and Newsboy, Erika Takacs from band True Bliss, What Now? hosts, Shortland Street's Katrina Devine, and Spike the penguin from Squirt. Also popping by are Bart and Lisa from The Simpsons, and Aussie Portia de Rossi (then appearing on American show Ally McBeal). The promo was made by Saatchi & Saatchi.

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Mai FM - It's Cool to Kōrero

1999, Subject - Television

This 1999 documentary tells the story of radio station Mai FM. Founded in 1992 by Auckland iwi Ngāti Whātua, its front-running mix of hip hop, r’n’b and te reo soon won rating success. Original breakfast host Robert Rakete recalls early days when the station was a CD player hooked up to an aerial, while Mai FM's champions argue the radio station has executed its kaupapa: promoting Māori language and culture to the youth of Auckland, including the breakout phrase, “it’s cool to kōrero!” The intro by Tainui Stephens was done for Māori Television documentary slot He Raranga Kōrero.  

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McDonald's Young Entertainers - 1999 Grand Final

1999, Judge

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SportsCafe

2006, Producer - Television

Producer Ric Salizzo followed a series of All Black tour videos with this popular long-running live show. The Sky Sport (later TV2) series featured interviews and skits, and gathered a loyal following for its recipe of sports fandom mixed with schoolboy pratfalls (and tension between larrikin ex-All Black Marc Ellis and co-host Lana Coc-Kroft). Other members of the circus that Salizzo tried to wrangle included That Guy (Leigh Hart), Eva the Bulgarian (Eva Evguenieva), Graeme Hill, and the Human Canonball (Ben Hickey). The show made a brief comeback in 2008.

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Mai Time

1995 - 2003, Presenter, Associate Producer - Television

Mai Time was an influential magazine show for Māori youth, exploring te ao Māori and pop culture (it was one of the first shows to show local hip-hop), with presenters speaking in te reo and English. Running for 12 years, it began as a slot on Marae, then screened on Saturday mornings on TV2. Mai Time was a breeding ground for Māori television talent: launching the careers of Stacey Morrison (nee Daniels), Quinton Hita, Teremoana Rapley and others. It was the brainchild of Tainui Stephens, and was produced by Greg Mayor, then from 2004 by Anahera Higgins.

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Marae

1995, Presenter - Television

Marae is the longest running Māori current affairs programme. First broadcast in 1992, the magazine programme aims to keep its audience in touch with the issues, political or otherwise, that affect Māori, and explain kaupapa Māori from a Māori perspective. The Marae Digipoll gives the programme publicity in other media as a respected barometer of matters Māori. Marae was re-launched in October 2010 as Marae Investigates, presented by Scotty Morrison and Jodi Ihaka Marae. It screens on TV One, and is presented half in english and half in te reo Māori. 

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Māori Sports Awards

2007 - 2009, Presenter

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InFocus

1998 - 1999,1998 - 1999, Presenter, Researcher

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What Now?

1990 - 1994, Presenter - Television

What Now? is a long-running entertainment show for primary school-aged children. Filmed before a live studio audience on weekend mornings, What Now? is a New Zealand TV institution; it was the first TV show to have live phone-ins. The series is known for its challenges that sometimes result in participants being 'gunged'. A roll-call of presenters includes Steve Parr, Danny Watson, Simon Barnett, Jason Gunn, Michelle A'Court, Tamati Coffey, Antonia Prebble, and more. 'Get out of your Lazy Bed' by Matt Bianco is the theme song memorable to generations of Kiwi kids.

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It's in the Bag

2009 - ongoing , Presenter - Television

Travelling quiz show It’s in the Bag was fronted in its first, extended incarnation by Selwyn Toogood (based on his radio series), before being revived by Māori Television in 2009, with Pio Terei as host. Competitors have to answer three questions before they can pick a bag, hoping it contains treasure. Several of Toogood's catchphrases — "by hokey!”, ”what’ll it be customers, the money or the bag?” — became TV catchphrases. His glam bag ladies included Heather Eggleton and Tineke Bouchier. After Toogood's 1986 retirement, John Hawkesby took over, then Nick Tansley.