O'Baby

Charlie ASH, Music Video, 2006

Winning Best Overall Video at the 2006 Radio Active Handle the Jandal Music Video Awards, Charlie ASH certainly made a splash with their debut video by director Sally Tran. The delightfully ramshackle clip for the raunchy number channels the DIY fantasy spirit of Michel Gondry as Rosie Riggir and the band inhabit a CASH-in-wonderland world of cardboard and cellophane sets, animation and colour. Caution: contains fondling of oversized instruments. 

You Make the Whole World Smile

The Red Nose Band featuring Hammond Gamble, Music Video, 1992

The video for this Red Nose Day chart-topper makes the most of a powerhouse combination: celebrities and cute babies. Although lead singer Hammond Gamble gets his share of screen time, the video is mostly devoted to close-ups of perhaps the biggest pile-up of famous Kiwis ever to cram into one music video. The faces include appearances early on by actors Simone Kessell, Ilona Rodgers, and Mark Raffety  plus The Wizard, sports legends Grant Fox, John Kirwan and Jeremy Coney, newsreaders Judy Bailey and Anita McNaught, and singers Tina Cross and Suzanne Lynch. 

Advice for Young Mothers to Be

The Veils, Music Video, 2006

Former schoolmates having babies were Finn Andrews' inspiration for this elegant, optimistic piece of chamber pop from the second Veils album Nux Vomica (named for the poison tree which produces strychnine and a homeopathic remedy). The delightfully wry video finds the band's performance in a pink-swathed set invaded by crawling babies and toddlers. The song celebrates a single mother's right to raise her child; the band's interactions with the babies suggests they'll be content to keep the next generation at arm's length for quite some time.

Rumba

The L.E.D.s, Music Video, 2006

Winner of Best Video at the Undertheradar 2007 People's Choice Music Awards, the clip could be seen as director Daniel Batkin-Smith's subtle nod to early Flying Nun work (featuring bike riding, a cat, kitchen-ware, walking on a beach and a baby.)   "We liked Dan so much we asked him to join the band after he shot the clip. And he did! I was reminded how much more fun it is to ride a bike without a helmet. I really miss that." Blair Parkes - March 09 

People

Mi-Sex, Music Video, 1980

Mi-Sex moved further into the futuristic sci-fi world signalled by their hit single ‘Computer Games’ with the release of their chart topping second album Space Race in 1980. The lead-off single ‘People’ emerged at a time when the world was still coming to grips with cloning, genetic engineering and test tube babies. The video showcases the band’s well honed combination of techno-pop and the more straight ahead rock’n’roll beloved of Australian pub audiences — with some visual special effects reserved for the future shock of the spoken segment.

AFFCO

The Skeptics, Music Video, 1987

Publicly screened only a handful of times, AFFCO hasn't met with universal approval. Yet for many, this Stuart Page bombshell is the pièce de résistance of NZ music video art.   "It's been written that it was 'animal rights' inspired, which is incorrect. The song was written purely about some guys who 'pack meat' and the video was made in that light. I guess we got carried away wrapping David d'Ath in glad wrap, baby oil and food colouring in an upstairs room at my Freeman's Bay flat."  Stuart Page     CAUTION: This video contains images which may offend some viewers.  

Secret Game

Zeisha, Music Video, 2008

The video for this debut single from singer and DJ Zeisha Fremaux cuts between candyfloss colours and Zeisha in a brunette bob against black. Rapper PNC (aka Sam Hansen) also makes an appearance. Zeisha was nominated for best female artist at the 2008 Pacific Music Awards, and played gigs in Asia. The clip is from director Sally Tran (Wayho, O'Baby).

Kaleidoscope World

The Chills, Music Video, 1982

This was the first music video for iconic Dunedin group The Chills. Directed by Peter Janes, the promo for the song roams around an aptly chilly looking attic while the band performs. As soap bubbles float towards the rafters, there’s fog on the breath of singer Martin Phillipps, who lulls the listener to swim into space with him. “Come along baby we'll live in our kaleidoscope world”. The early Chills song was from Flying Nun’s seminal Dunedin Double EP. It was later featured as the opening (and title) track on The Chills’ debut LP, a 1986 compilation of early songs for the band.