Series

Radar's Patch

Television, 2010

In this series about living sustainably, comedian Te Radar swaps the farm for town to transform a quarter acre overgrown lawn into a lush garden. Using recycled materials and organic methods, Te Radar faces a mission to clear the jungle that is his property and make a profit selling his produce. Throughout the series he visits eco-friendly businesses, including a firm that converts waste cooking oil into biodiesel, and turns to locals to help with his challenge. The series followed on from Off the Radar, in which Te Radar aimed to live solely off produce from his farm.

Series

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?

Television, 1998–2004

This Greenstone Pictures' series was a mixed plate of reality TV, cooking show and Stage One Anthropology. The (Kiwi) concept is simple: presenter Suzanne Paul invades a house with a camera crew and mystery dinner guest, while restauranteur Varick Neilson cooks the occupants dinner. Special guests included David McPhail, Temuera Morrison, Mike King and Kevin Smith. Two series were screened in 1998 and 1999, with a third screening in 2004.

Series

Hunger for the Wild

Television, 2006–2008

Hunger for the Wild took Wellington chefs Al Brown and Steve Logan out of their fine dining restaurant and into the wilds of Aotearoa, on a fishing, foraging and hunting culinary adventure. Putting the local in 'locally sourced', each episode involves Al and Steve splitting up and collecting ingredients (and characters) for an end of episode meal. The homegrown and cooked dish is then toasted with a wine selected by Logan. Three series were produced for TVNZ by Peter Young's Fisheye films, winning a 2007 NZ Screen Award and Best Lifestyle Series at the 2009 Qantas Awards.

Series

Joe's World on a Plate

Television, 2013

Globetrotting Wellington chef Joe McLeod (Ngāi Tūhoe) has cooked professionally in more than 30 countries over the course of a career that began in 1972. In this bilingual series made for Māori Television, he takes recipes, tastes and flavours that he has encountered on those travels, and combines them with local NZ ingredients (including some of the 70 varieties of native greens used in traditional Māori cuisine). In each episode, McLeod reminisces in English and te reo about his life and travels as he prepares a starter, a main and a dessert.

Series

Real Food for Real People with Jo Seagar

Television, 1998–1999

Well-known Kiwi chef Jo Seagar trained as a cordon bleu chef in London and France, before returning home to promote a culinary style involving “maximum effect, minimum effort.” Her 1997 best-selling book You Shouldn't Have Gone To So Much Trouble, Darling caught TVNZ’s attention and Real Food marked her TV debut. The two series covered recipes from sushi to pecan pie. In a 2012 interview with Avenue, Seagar mentioned that the show rated highly, despite Television New Zealand initially telling her that a food show would never screen in primetime.

Series

Keep Calm and Carry On

Television, 2012

This 2012 JAM TV series followed media personality Jaquie Brown as she confronted the travails of 21st Century motherhood, raising her first child Leo. Directed by Jane Andrews, the series mixed a video diary (sleep deprivation, poop and occasional joy), with reenactments, interviews, and archive material. Brown had earlier written a cheeseburger crotch n’all chronicle of her pregnancy, I’m Not Fat, I’m Pregnant. The six-part series was filmed for two half-days a week, over a year. It screened on TV One on Wednesdays at 8pm.

Series

Ngāi Tahu Mahinga Kai

Web, 2015

Iwi Ngāi Tahu turns filmmaker in this web series about mahinga kai (food gathering) in Te Waipounamu (the South Island). The 12 short episodes feature tangata whenua talking about all aspects of traditional food gathering practises, from storage (pōhā), transport (mōkihi) and making traditional medicine (rongoā), to the actual kai — such as īnaka (whitebait), kōura (crayfish), pāua and pātiki (flounder). Ngāi Tahu Mahinga Kai travels far and wide from the bush in Kaikōura to rivers in Murihiku (Southland), and moana on the east and west coasts.

Series

Ken's Hunting and Fishing Show

Television, 2007

This homespun, informative and gently satirical hunting and fishing series is presented by good kiwi bloke Ken Moller (Lynda Topp from the Topp Twins). With alpine guide, Queenstown radio DJ and crack shot Emma Lange, aka Lady Hunter, Ken takes viewers on armchair adventures to some of New Zealand's most spectacular wilderness regions where they hunt sika stag, fish for feisty rainbow trout and "bloody beautiful browns". Closing segment Ken's Camp Kitchen features "gastronomical delights" such as venison casserole.

Series

Maggie's Garden Show

Television, 1992–2003

Maggie's Garden Show (originally Palmers Garden Show) was a popular TV One series that ran from 1992 to 2003. Featuring ‘bug man’ Ruud Kleinpaste, gardening experts Bill Ward, Jack Hobbs, Gordon Collier and Professor John Walker, and of course, the nation’s most beloved ginger gardener, host Maggie Barry. The Ellerslie Flower Show special was a perennial favourite amongst viewers; a review from the Herald notes, “In an age where TV personalities grow to be larger than life, Maggie's Garden Show has stuck to its information-based roots.”

Series

A Dog's Show

Television, 1977–1992

Man. Dog. Sheep. This was an unlikely formula for Kiwi TV gold. Showing sheepdog trials from around the country, A Dog’s Show ran from 1977 to 1992. In each trial a farmer, armed with an array of whistles and commands, instructed a sheepdog to wrangle a flock of recalcitrant sheep along a course or into a pen while the bearded, sagacious, Swannie-clad John Gordon provided the commentary. Trivia: the opening tune is a version of the Statler Brothers song ‘Flowers on the Wall’, also used in movie Pulp Fiction.